Transgender women taking PrEP have lower levels of PrEP drugs than cisgender men

aidsmap/nam, November 9th 2018

A study presented at October’s HIV Research for Prevention conference (HIVR4P) in Madrid shows that transgender women who are taking feminising hormones and also taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have levels of the PrEP drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine in their blood that are about 25% lower than those in cisgender men, and levels in rectal tissue cells about 40% lower. Tenofovir levels in rectal tissue were 44% lower.

However, the study also confirmed that the interaction between hormones and PrEP did not appear to go the other way; blood levels of estradiol, the one hormone all of the transgender women took in one form or another, do not appear to be affected by PrEP.

 

Do Estrogen Therapies Affect Sexual Function in Early Postmenopause?

JAMA Internal Medicine, 2017

Transdermal estrogen therapy delivered through the skin modestly improved sexual function in early postmenopausal women, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Declining estrogen levels around the menopausal transition are commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, which can be an important determinant of women’s health and quality of life.

In the new article, Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., of the Yale School of Medicine, and his coauthors report on an ancillary study of a clinical trial that examined changes in sexual function in recently postmenopausal women.

 

A Fate Worse than Death? Being Transgender in Long-term Care

Psychology Benefits Society blog ( American Psychological Association), Oct 26, 2017

“I would kill myself.” This is what a 70 year-old transgender woman told me recently when I asked what she would do if she needed long-term care. While this sounds dramatic, it is a common sentiment among older transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) adults (Witten, 2014).

Many TGNC older adults do not have family caregivers available to meet their needs for assistance in later life, having been rejected and ostracized by their families of origin according to a study by Grant and colleagues (2011), and long-term care services may be their only option.

Read more of Being Transgender in Long-term Care

 

SA Practitioners List for Trans* Health

Trans* Health South Australia, Updated 6th February 2017

The SA Practitioners List: A Community Directory for Sex and Gender Diverse Persons in South Australia has been updated.

The list was compiled by gender diverse community members last year, and is continually undergoing development to attempt to better reflect community needs. It features GPs, psychiatrists, endocrinologists, counselling psychologists, clinical psychologists, sexual health physicians, gynaecologists, surgeons, and allied health practitioners.

The list is based on feedback from members of the community and/or practitioners directly.

Trans Health SA is a peer run site to support the gender diverse community, professionals, allies and those interested in where to access various resources in South Australia.

  • Access updated list here 
  • See Trans* Health South Australia website here 

“Trans Men Need the Competent Fertility Care I Never Got”

Advocate, March 09 2016

For as long as I can remember, I have wanted children. For most of my life, I thought that I would carry my child, but those feelings changed shortly after I came out as a trans man and started taking testosterone.

Producing a genetically related child was still important to me, but I was no longer able to see myself carrying a pregnancy. After discussing all of our options, my wife, Caroline, and I decided that the closest we would ever get to creating another human together would be to fertilize my eggs with donor sperm and to then implant the embryo into Caroline for her to carry the baby.

Now after the process I am left with psychological pain from my memories of being treated like a disease that one might catch, and my fear of this happening every time I see a new doctor.

Read more here

New website with information on drug use and sexual & mental health, for the LGBTI community

24/11/2015

Today, a website has be launched to provide advice and information on drug use and sexual and mental health, focused on the Australian LGBTI community.

The website, TouchBase, is a collaboration between the Victorian AIDS Council, the Australian Drug Foundation and the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisatios (AFAO).

It is the first online resource to deal with how recreational drugs can interact with prescription medication and hormones.
It also shows people where they can get support in their state of residence.
Access TouchBase website here