Women taking pill may be less likely to suffer ACL injury, study finds

The Guardian,

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

Rise of contraceptive apps sparks fears over unwanted pregnancies

Guardian, 

Reproductive health of HIV-positive women being neglected, says Swiss study

nam/aidsmap, 06 February 2018

HIV-positive women in Switzerland are mainly relying on male condoms for contraception, investigators report in HIV Medicine. “Male condoms remained the most frequently used contraceptive method, whereas the use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was very uncommon,” note the researchers. “One in six women using contraceptives experienced an unwanted pregnancy, with 42% occurring while using a combined hormonal pill.

The investigators suggest that HIV clinicians need to do more to encourage effective contraceptive use by women with HIV, especially in the light of growing awareness that people with HIV with undetectable viral load do not transmit HIV. If couples stop using the male condom, women need information about which contraceptive options are suitable for them.

Withdrawing Depo-Provera contraceptives would result in more lives lost than HIV infections prevented

aidsmap / nam,  11 January 2018

Even if Depo-Provera and other contraceptive injections raise the risk of HIV infection, withdrawing them from use in African countries would greatly increase maternal mortality, a modelling study has shown. The loss of life due to pregnancy complications and unsafe abortions would far outweigh the number of HIV infections prevented, according to the study published in the December issue of Global Health: Science and Practice.

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to ABC report on Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

SHINE SA, Issued: 13 December 2017

SHINE SA believes that decisions about contraception should be made in conjunction with a health care professional and that everyone should have access to accurate and unbiased information to enable appropriate informed contraceptive choice.

LARCs (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) including the levonorgestrel IUD1 (Mirena) and the subdermal implant (Implanon NXT) are the most effective reversible methods of contraception available. They have the additional advantage of being long lasting, convenient to use and generally well regarded by most users. LARC method failure rates rival that of tubal sterilization at <1% and unintended pregnancy rates are lower than those reported for contraceptive pill users.

Like all progestogen only contraceptive methods, LARCs may result in a change of bleeding pattern which may include no bleeding, frequent or prolonged bleeding. Users of the levonorgestrel IUD most commonly experience a reduction in bleeding over time and it is used as a treatment for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding for this reason. Only 1 in 5 users of the contraceptive implant have an increase in bleeding that persists beyond the first few months.

LARC use, and in particular the subdermal implant, is not known to be associated with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the upper part of the female reproductive system namely the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. PID is a known side effect of IUD insertion but occurs in less than 1 in 300 people. The risk of PID is only increased for the first 3 weeks after insertion, after which it returns to the previous background risk. Users of IUDs are encourage to return at any sign of infection and when treated promptly with antibiotics are unlikely to experience any long term complications.