Giving gay men self-test kits increases HIV testing by 50% – but STI tests decrease

aidsmap/nam, 21 August 2018

Gay men who were offered HIV home-testing kits took 50% more tests than men who only took HIV tests at clinics or community organisations, a randomised controlled study from Seattle in the USA has found.

The men who could self-test took fewer tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), though it is not completely clear whether this was because they went less often for STI checkups or had fewer STI symptoms.

 

Act To Prevent Men’s Violence Against Women A Guide For Community Action

Women’s Health West. 2018

This resource is for community members or groups who are planning to undertake actions to prevent men’s violence against women.

This resource details practical things you can do every day to prevent men’s violence against women. It also includes important information to consider before you take action, as well as links to further resources.

Using Chosen Names Reduces Odds of Depression and Suicide in Transgender Youths

The University of Texas at Austin, Tue, April 3, 2018

In one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at The University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.     

“Many kids who are transgender have chosen a name that is different than the one that they were given at birth,” said author Stephen T. Russell, professor and chair of human development and family science. “We showed that the more contexts or settings where they were able to use their preferred name, the stronger their mental health was.”

 

Domestic violence leading cause of hospitalised assault among girls and women in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), 19 April 2017

Nearly 6,500 women and girls were hospitalised due to assault in Australia in 2013–14, with the violence usually perpetrated by a partner or spouse, according to new analysis from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The data, available as part of a new series of fact sheets on selected injuries, shows that over half of hospitalised assaults against women and girls were perpetrated by spouses or domestic partners (59% of cases where the perpetrator was specified), with injuries to the head most common (61%).

Parents and other family members accounted for nearly half of the remaining cases where the type of perpetrator was specified.