HIV & the Law: updated content from ASHM

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, 2019

The NEW Guide to Australian HIV Laws and Policies for Healthcare Professionals includes two new sections on Mandatory Testing for HIV and My Health Record.

This resource aims to provide health care workers with information on legal and ethical responsibilities under various laws and regulations related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It does not contain legal advice. Those seeking advice on individual cases should contact their health department, solicitor or their medical defence organisation as appropriate.

In the interests of brevity, laws have been summarised and re-written specifically as they relate to HIV. In many instances key legislation is more broadly targeted at a range of infectious diseases (with definitions varying by state).

All efforts have been made to ensure the content is current at time of publication.

STI/BBV testing tool for asymptomatic people

NSW STI Programs Unit, ASHM & Qld. Govt.,  2019

This resource has charts and information about how routine STI/BBV testing can be offered, who to, and how to follow up.

Developed by NSW STI Programs Unit, NSW Australia, and reproduced with permission by the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, ASHM and Communicable Diseases Branch.

 

 

Hyde Street Practice: a service of SHINE SA

SHINE SA, September 2019

Hyde Street Practice is a service of SHINE SA. We offer affordable appointments with friendly and non-judgemental staff.

We are a safe and inclusive practice with general practitioners, specialist services, sexual health and relationship wellbeing services.

Services include:

  • General Practitioners

General GP services, including support for diabetes and cardiovascular health, Pre and post exposure HIV prevention (PEP and PrEP), HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C prescribing, STI testing and management

  • Sexual Health Services

SHINE SA sexual health services including contraception, STI testing and management, HIV, PEP & PrEP

  • Sexual Health Physician

A private specialist sexual health and HIV service available by referral

HIV, sexual health, PEP & PrEP, hepatitis C, transgender medicine, LGBTI health

  • Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing

Walk in and Wait service, peer led with results in 20 minutes

  • Psychologist and Counselling

General psychological services and sexual health counselling

  • Gender Wellbeing Service

Professional, peer support and information services for people who are questioning their gender or who identify as trans or gender diverse

  • SAMESH

Support services for gay men, MSM (men who have sex with men), trans men and people living with HIV and people at risk of HIV and STIs, health promotion and education

  • Bobby Goldsmith Foundation

Financial assistance for health related issues to people living with HIV on low incomes

Details:

57 Hyde Street, Adelaide
Call 7099 5320
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fees available on hydestreet.com.au
To make an appointment visit
www.hydestreet.com.au

or call 7099 5320

Rapido – Rapid HIV Testing
Mondays 3:00 – 6:00 pm
(except Public Holidays)

Sexual Health Service
Walk in and Wait
Fridays 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Clean Needle Program
Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

STIs among transgender men and women attending Australian sexual health clinics

Med J Aust. 2019 Aug 29. doi: 10.5694/mja2.50322. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Objectives

To estimate rates of HIV infection, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and infectious syphilis in transgender men and women in Australia; to compare these rates with those for cisgender people.

Design

Cross‐sectional, comparative analysis of de‐identified health data.

Setting, participants

We analysed data for 1260 transgender people (404 men, 492 women, 364 unrecorded gender), 78 108 cisgender gay and bisexual men, and 309 740 cisgender heterosexual people who attended 46 sexual health clinics across Australia during 2010–2017.

Main outcome measures

First‐visit test positivity for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), stratified by patient group and year; demographic and behavioural factors associated with having STIs.

Results

14 of 233 transgender men (6.0%) and 34 of 326 transgender women (10%) tested during first clinic visits were chlamydia‐positive; nine transgender men (4%) and 28 transgender women (8.6%) were gonorrhoea‐positive. One of 210 tested transgender men (0.5%) and ten of 324 tested transgender women (3.1%) were diagnosed with infectious syphilis; 14 transgender men (3.5%) and 28 transgender women (5.7%) were HIV‐positive at their first visit. The only significant change in prevalence of an STI among transgender patients during the study period was the increased rate of gonorrhoea among transgender women (from 3.1% to 9.8%). Compared with cisgender gay and bisexual men, transgender men were less likely (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.71; P = 0.001) and transgender women as likely (aOR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.73–1.32; P = 0.92) to be diagnosed with a bacterial STI; compared with heterosexual patients, transgender men were as likely (aOR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.46–1.13; P = 0.16) and transgender women more likely (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.16–2.10; P = 0.003) to receive a first‐visit bacterial STI diagnosis.

Conclusions

The epidemiology of STIs in transgender people attending Australian sexual health clinics differs from that of cisgender patients. Gender details must be captured by health data systems to facilitate appropriate delivery of sexual health care.

Imagining HIV In 2030

Imagining HIV In 2030: Exploring Possible Futures And Charting A Path Forward

ACON, 21/08/2019

What does HIV look like in 2030? How do we make sure people living with HIV age healthily and well? What needs to be done so that everyone benefits equally from NSW’s leading HIV response? These are some of the issues explored in a new discussion paper developed by ACON.

Imagining HIV in 2030 speculates about possible futures over the next decade, examining how current trends and future developments will impact the HIV landscape in NSW. In doing so, it delves into what needs to be done to ensure community, sector and government responses to HIV prevention, treatment and support in NSW remain on course.

Sexual health and its linkages to reproductive health: an operational approach

 World Health Organization, 2017

Sexual health and reproductive health are closely linked, but crucial aspects of sexual health can be overlooked when grouped under or together with the domain of reproductive health.

In order to create broader awareness of comprehensive sexual health interventions and to ensure that sexual health and reproductive health both receive full attention in programming (including provision of health services) and research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reviewed its working definition of sexual health to create a framework for an operational approach to sexual health.

The framework, which is intended to support policy-makers and programme implementers and to provide a stronger foundation for further research and learning in sexual health, is presented and described in full in this brief.