Call for Papers: Edited Collection on Sexuality and Sexual Identities in Literature for Young People

Deakin University, October 2018

Acknowledging the capacity of literature to reflect and shape significant aspects of human development, this collection of essays takes as its central theme the representation of sexuality and sexual identities in texts for young people. Previous scholarship has established important connections between sexuality and gender, as well as sexuality and queerness, in literature for children and young adults. Investigations have also been made into the way particular genres and individual texts deal with desire, sex and sexuality.

This collection builds upon these individual approaches, while extending out to the analysis of various forms and incarnations of sexuality, across genres, texts and time periods. Keeping sexuality and sexual identities in writing for young people as its core focus, it will include analysis and discussion of representations of heterosexualities, homonormativity, trans subjectivities, asexuality, and the intersections between sexuality and other identity categories such as gender, race and class, across a range of texts and readerships.

The editors therefore welcome abstracts that revisit historical approaches to the study of childhood/adolescence and sexuality in literature, as well as those that provide contemporary and forward-looking models that take account of current and emerging sexual identities. Similarly, they welcome a wide range of theoretical approaches to this subject matter.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• Sex and sexuality in historical literature for children
• Same-sex desire in young adult fiction from Stonewall to the AIDS era
• Hetero- and homo-normative families in picture books and junior fiction
• “Straightness” in junior and/or young adult fiction
• Queer spaces and queer geographies in writing for young people
• Trans identities in children’s texts
• Intersections between sexuality and race, class, gender, ability, age and/or nationality
• Transnational approaches to sex and sexuality
• Connections between romance narratives and ideologies around sex and sexuality
• Religion/religious themes and sexual morality
• “Post-gay” identities in millennial writing for young people
• The role of genre in depictions of sex and sexuality for young people

  • Please submit abstracts of up to 300 words and a biographical note of up to 150 words to Dr Kristine Moruzi  and Dr Paul Venzo  by December 1, 2018. Full papers of 6000 words will be due by May 1, 2019.

Sex Industry Network (SIN) events for FEAST festival

SIN, November 2017

SIN is the South Australian Sex Industry Network.

SIN is run by sex workers for sex workers and offers peer support, education, information, advocacy and referral services for sex workers.

SIN has two events scheduled for FEAST. These events are open to the general public.

1. SIN Retrospective

This multimedia retrospective by sex workers showcases projects, posters and artwork exploring the realities of trans, male, female and street-based sex workers across ages and cultural backgrounds.

When: from Thurs 9th- Mon 27th Nov, 11am – 10pm daily

(Opening night is Wed 8th Nov 5:30-7:30)

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hote

2. Ask a Sex Worker a Question

Step into the Fantasy Brothel confidential confessional and ask a sex worker everything you always wanted to know about sex work but were too afraid to ask.

2 sessions:

Wed 15th Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Wed 22nd Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hotel

SHINE SA’s FRESH Course: Disability and Mental Health Focus

SHINE SA, October 2017

This dynamic 3-day course aims to update workers to include relationships and sexual health education and support in their work.

On completion of the FRESH Course you will have:side
• an increased level of confidence working with people in the area of sexual health and  relationships
• a better understanding of how values and beliefs may influence your practice in this area of work
• a new vocabulary about sexual health and relationships to use in practice
• skills to support sexual health needs
• developed an understanding of current resources available and how to use them effectively

Topics covered:

• History of Sexuality & Disability
• Contraception & Pregnancy Options
• STIs & Safer Sex
• Healthy Relationships
• Sex & The Law
• Impact of psychotropic medications
• Sexual Violence & Safety
• Sexual & Gender Diversity
• Assessment tools
• Resource exploration
• Communicating about sexuality

WHEN: 14–16 November 2017 (Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday)
WHERE: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm
COST: $399 Student Concession: $359

Design Agency ‘Frog’ Redesigns The Dreaded Gynecology Exam

co.design

Cold metal. Eerie clicking sound. Torturous duck-billed shape. Yes, I’m talking about the speculum, the anxiety-inducing device that doctors use to check  vaginal health. Despite its status as an instrument of discomfort and its dark history–involving a doctor who experimented on slave women – the speculum remains to this day one of the centerpieces of the often dreaded annual pelvic exam.

A team of four designers at the global design agency Frog is on a mission to redesign it – and reimagine what it means to go to the gynecologist in the first place.

West African HIV-2 prevalence associated with lower historical male circumcision rate

Medical News Today, 

Cities with substantial uncircumcised populations in 1950 tended to have higher HIV-2 prevalence from 1985.

In West African cities, male circumcision rates in 1950 were negatively correlated with HIV-2 prevalence from 1985, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by João Sousa from the University of Leuven, Belgium, and colleagues.

  • Read more here
  • Access journal paper (open access) here

Out of sight: the untold story of Adelaide’s gay hate murders

SBS, Oct 17th, 2016

For decades, gay bashers operated with impunity. Sometimes, they killed their victims. The police often didn’t care. Sometimes, they were said to be doing the bashing.

A culture of indifference meant the bodies piled up as the world looked the other way. But little is known about gay hate crimes outside those now widely documented in NSW. This SBS investigation explores alleged gay hate crimes in South Australia.

Read more: here

Listen to podcast episodes: 

Late one night in 1992, Rex Robinson pulled his car into one of Adelaide’s most notorious beats. High beam on, Rex sees a man lying face down, motionless in the middle of the road. It’s the night that embroiled Rex in a vicious bashing case which made headlines and outraged the gay community, leaving him without a job and wishing he’d never gone to the police.

Dr. George Duncan’s body was pulled from the River Torrens in 1972. At the time, homosexuality was illegal. Police were the suspects in the murder. It’s a case that’s gone on to become one of South Australia’s most notorious unsolved murders, altered history for all gay men in the state.

Beats are secretive places – they provide anonymity for men seeking sex, but this secrecy also provides a cover and protection for their attackers. “Todd” ran away at 16 and lived on the streets of Adelaide. The street kids he hung out with used to head to beats and used Todd as bait to lure men into the bushes because of how young he looked. This wasn’t the only group targeting homosexuals at beats.

David “John” Saint was an ordinary guy. He worked, bought three houses, did them up and sold them. On April 16, 1991, he was found covered in blood on a main Adelaide street by a passer-by. He didn’t make it. From day one, police said publicly that robbery was the motive. But this didn’t sit well with the gay community.

There is a way you can take a gay murder and make it not a gay murder. You get a good lawyer. This is what happened in 2011 to the brutal killing of Andrew Negre that continues to bounce around the legal system.