New periodic survey on sexual health among young heterosexual people

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, 2017

Between December 2015 and March 2016, the ‘It’s Your Love Life’ periodic survey recruited 2,120 heterosexually-identified young people aged 15–29 years and living in New South Wales (NSW). The data collected through the survey contributes new knowledge on the attitudes and practices of heterosexual young people and their exposure to sexual health promotion initiatives.

Results indicate that substantial effort is required to support heterosexual young people in ensuring their sexual health.

Contents include:

  • Knowledge of sexually transmissible infections (STIs)
  • Perceived severity of STIs
  • Perceived risk of contracting an STI
  • Condom use-related views
  • Carrying condoms while being on a date
  • Sexual intercourse with and without condoms
  • Contraception
  • STI testing-related views
  • Testing for STIs and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Exposure to messages promoting condom use and testing for STIs
  • Familiarity and engagement with sexual health promotion resources, activities and services
  • Sexual health education in secondary schools

IYLL is an online cross-sectional survey that will be repeated annually. A first round of data collection was completed between December 2015 and March 2016

In[ter]view: SHINE SA’s Dr Amy Moten

Verse magazine, Edition 18, September 2017

This edition we talked to Amy, SHINE SA’s Medical Educator, who is answering all your questions when it comes to the ‘what’s this’ and ‘how do I check that’ of sex.

  1. How often should people who are sexually active get tested?

You should have a test when symptoms of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) are first noticed or if a sexual partner is diagnosed with an STI or has symptoms of an STI. Even if you have no symptoms STI screening is recommended for any new sexual contact. Annual screening for people under 30 is recommended, but you can have a test every 3 months if you think you may be at higher risk.

 

HIV infections in NSW have fallen to their lowest levels — except for one group of people

news.com.au, August 29, 2017

Many people born overseas seem oblivious to efforts to stamp out HIV in Australia. Marco Matillano, an Australian of Filipino descent who has had his own brush with HIV, thinks he know at least part of the answer — bashfulness when it comes to sex.

He said there’s an unwillingness for friends, family — and even people themselves — to discuss sexual health and there remains a lingering “shame” in some Asian people of being honest about becoming infected. This in turn discourages them from seeking out information on HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus.

Mr Matillano said information on the virus should be in different languages, be targeted more directly at Asian-Australians and not be judgmental or lecturing, as they get enough of that at home.

The updated 2017 ASHM HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Guidelines

Journal of Virus Eradication, 2017; 3: 168–184

Daily use of co-formulated tenofovir and emtricitabine for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by populations at high risk of HIV infection is now recommended in guidelines from the United States, Europe and Australia and globally through the 2015 WHO guidelines. 

These 2017 Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine‘s (ASHM) PrEP Guidelines are an updated adaptation of the 2014 US Centers for Disease Control‘s PrEP guidelines and are designed to:

    • Support the prescription of PrEP using forms of coformulated tenofovir and emtricitabine that have been registered in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and other bioequivalent generic drugs that are available in Australia through self-importation, private prescription or Australian PrEP clinical trials
    • Assist clinicians in the evaluation of patients who are seeking PrEP
    • Assist clinicians in commencing and monitoring patients on PrEP including PrEP dosing schedules, management of side-effects and toxicity, use of PrEP in pregnancy and in chronic hepatitis B infection and how to cease PrEP

Daily PrEP with co-formulated tenofovir and emtricitabine, used continuously or for shorter periods of time, is recommended in these guidelines as a key HIV-prevention option for men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender men and women, heterosexual men and women, and people who inject drugs (PWID) at substantial risk of HIV acquisition.

Psychosexual Complications of FGM for Couples: A Comparative Study in Iran

wadi.org, 29.04.2017

Most research on the health and sexuality consequences of FGM has been limited to circumcised women, and prior to this study, no research was done on the effects of FGM in couples. With attention on psychosexual problems related to FGM and on increasing numbers of women who were circumcised in childhood and who have now reached the age of marriage or of being married, the sexual function, mental health and marital satisfaction of these women and their husbands is going to become an increasingly important issue.

Our study makes several contributions to what is known about the association between the relationship of mental health, marital satisfaction, and sexual function among couples who are victims of FGM. We found that FGM is strongly associated with marital dissatisfaction, sexual dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms for both wife and husband victims of FGM. As we expected, in the field of fear, paranoid thoughts, psychotic thoughts, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive tendencies, and feelings of inferiority, couples who were victims of FGM were in worse mental condition than normal couples Second, we found that marital satisfaction of couples who were victims of FGM was lower and worse condition than that of normal couples, specifically in the fields of personal issues, marital relationship, solving problems, and sexual relationship Finally, we found that sexual function of couples who were victims of FGM was lower, specifically in psychological arousal, physiologic arousal, ease of orgasm, and orgasm satisfaction, compared with normal couples.

  • Read more here
  • Access full text of journal article (PDF) here  

 

 

 

Antiretroviral sex: the transformation of safe sex?

February 2017

This free, public lecture, given by Associate Professor Martin Holt of the UNSW Centre for Social Research in Health, considers the radical shifts in HIV prevention associated with the use of HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

These prevention strategies provide new ways to safely avoid HIV, but also pose challenges to the ways communities understand, and potentially practice, ‘safe sex’. As safe sex transforms to accommodate the new possibilities provided by ‘antiretroviral sex’, what are the effects on sexual and social relations, identities and HIV-related stigma?

These prevention strategies provide new ways to safely avoid HIV, but also pose challenges to the ways communities understand, and potentially practice, ‘safe sex’. As safe sex transforms to accommodate the new possibilities provided by ‘antiretroviral sex’, what are the effects on sexual and social relations, identities and HIV-related stigma?

With n treatintroduction by The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG, and moderated by Dr Bridget Haire, AFAO President. The “Sex Lecture” is part of the 2017 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival.

  • Watch video (57 minutes) below