Hepatitis C – Peer insights on barriers and motivators to Direct-Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatment uptake

ARCSHS, 2018

The knowledge and experience of people who inject drugs (PWID) within peer programs is a vital asset to strategies for the scale-up of DAA treatment among PWID (Brown and Reeders, 2016). This study is focused on translating these “real time” peer insights into resources that support policy and programs to tailor to the needs of communities of people who inject.

This tailoring is critical to achieving the goal of eliminating hepatitis C. This broadsheet is the first of a series that will be produced over the duration of the project. This series will present current peer insights from the peer workers and other members of the people who inject community on the access to and uptake of the new hepatitis C treatment.

This broadsheet provides background to the study and presents an overview of the attitudes, beliefs and experiences of PWID related to the access and scale-up of direct acting antiviral treatment among this community.

A research project by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society in collaboration with peer-based organisations – Peer Based Harm Reduction WA, NSW Users and AIDS Association and Harm Reduction Victoria.

Hepatitis C Virus – for GPs, Nurses and Allied Health Professionals

Sonder, October 2018

In this education session, presenters Dr Dep Huynh, Ms Margery Milner and Mr Jeff Stewart will provide attendees with an update on the risk factors associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the management options available.

The presenters will also provide information on liver cirrhosis tests and how to choose and initiate the most appropriate HCV treatment for patients.

Learning objectives

  • Identify and understand the risk factors for HCV screening;
  • Perform correct diagnosis of chronic HCV using reflexive testing;
  • Assess and manage patients for liver cirrhosis using non-invasive tests;
  • Improve patient safety by choosing the most appropriate HCV treatment according to the patient’s characteristics and co-medications;
  • Discuss and improve your understanding on how to initiate HCV treatment.

Presented by

Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia

Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Agenda

6.30pm – 7.00pm Registration and dinner
7.00pm – 8.00pm Presentation by Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia8.00pm – 8.10pm Tea/coffee break
8.10pm – 9.10pm Presentation by Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital
9.10pm – 9.30pm Questions, evaluation & close

RACGP QI & CPD Category 2, 4 Points

DATE AND TIME

Mon. 5 November 2018

6:15 pm – 9:30 pm ACDT

LOCATION

Arya Restaurant

30/81 O’Connell Street

North Adelaide, SA 5006

This program is funded by the Adelaide Primary Health Network - an Australian Government initiative

 

‘Sussing that doctor out’: Experiences of people affected by hepatitis C regarding private GPs in SA

‘Sussing that doctor out.’ Experiences and perspectives of people affected by hepatitis C regarding engagement with private general practitioners in South Australia: a qualitative study

BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Nov 29;18(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12875-017-0669-2.

Abstract

Background: Australians with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can access affordable Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatments with high cure rates (>90%), via General Practitioners (GPs). Benefits from this treatment will be maximised if people with HCV readily disclose and engage with private GPs regarding HCV-related issues. Investigating the perceptions and experiences of people affected by HCV with GPs can allow for this pathway to care for HCV to be improved.

Methods: In 2013–2014, 22 purposively sampled participants from South Australia (SA) were interviewed. They a) had contracted or were at risk of hepatitis C (n = 10), b) were key workers who had clients affected by HCV (n = 6), and c) met both a) and b) criteria (n = 6). The semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.

Results: People affected by HCV viewed GPs as a source of general healthcare but, due to negative experiences and perceptions, many developed a strategy of “sussing” out doctors before engaging with and disclosing to a GP regarding HCV-related issues. Participants were doubtful about the benefits of engagement and disclosure, and did not assume that they would be provided best-practice care in a non-discriminatory, non-judgemental way. They perceived risks to confidentiality and risks of changes to the care they received from GPs upon disclosure.

Conclusion: GPs may need to act in ways that counteract the perceived risks and persuade people affected by HCV of the benefits of seeking HCV-related care.

Upcoming forum – Call me by any name: the facts on meth and Hep A, B and C

SAMESH & Hepatitis SA, August 2018

Crystal? Ice? Tina? Have questions about methamphetamines?

Want to know the facts? How to look after yourself and others?

Curious about hepatitis A, B or C? Want to know more about transmission and treatment?

Come to our community forum & have your questions answered by experts.

Speakers: Gary Spence & Michelle Spudic – from Hepatitis SA

FREE EVENT

Date: 30 August 2018
Time: 6.30 PM – 8 PM
Location: SAMESH, 57 Hyde Street Adelaide

RSVP Register at samesh-enquiries@samesh.org.au
or call (08) 7099 5300

Download flyer here: CMBAN_Poster

Scotland’s reduction in new HCV infections is due to harm reduction, not treatment

infohep, Published:12 June 2018

The reduction in new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections that has taken place in Scotland since 2008 is most likely due to increased provision of needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapy, rather than a reduction in the number of people with hepatitis C as a result of increased treatment of HCV infection, a modelling study published in the journal Addiction reports.

Researchers from the University of Bristol and three Scottish universities developed a model of the Scottish HCV epidemic to test the impact of varying levels of harm reduction provision.

Gay men having chemsex are five times more likely to have a new HIV diagnosis than other gay men

aidsmap/nam,  23 May 2018

Gay and bisexual men who reported engaging in chemsex (the use of specific drugs to enhance or facilitate sex) were five times more likely to be newly diagnosed with HIV, nine times more likely to be diagnosed with hepatitis C and four times more likely to be diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection during a 13-month follow-up period, according to London data published this week in HIV Medicine.