Australian Health Organisations refute Cochrane Review Report and affirm efficacy of DAA therapy for hepatitis C

Joint position statement, Australia, June 2017

This joint Position Statement aims to strongly refute and reject the findings of the Cochrane Review report titled Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C, published by the Cochrane Hepato‐Biliary Group on 6 June 2017.

The Position Statement was prepared by the expert panel who published a Consensus Statement for Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C for virus infection representing the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (Australian Liver Association), the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, the Australasian Hepatology Association, Hepatitis Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

The organisations above developed this position statement to urge health practitioners and patients not to be swayed by this flawed report claiming new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C do not save lives.

Australian Government breaks silence on Hep C Inquiry

Hepatitis Australia, November 10, 2016

The Australian Government tabled its response to the Silent Disease – Inquiry into hepatitis C in Australia yesterday, but commits to little.  The Silent Disease Report was released by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health during June 2015 after extensive consultation with health experts, community organisations and people affected by hepatitis C.

In its response, the Government has fully agreed with just three of the ten recommendations in the report.

  • Read more here
  • Read the Government’s response here
  • Access the Silent Disease report here

Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C infection – app & website

Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, July 2016

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health challenge for Australia, affecting approximately 230,000 people who are at risk of progressive liver fibrosis leading to cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The burden of liver disease due to HCV is projected to triple by 2030. The introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies for HCV that are highly effective and well tolerated is a major medical advance. All Australians living with HCV should now be considered for antiviral therapy.

The Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C virus infection: a consensus statement 2016 [PDF] was prepared by an expert panel representing the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (Australian Liver Association), the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, the Australasian Hepatology Association, Hepatitis Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

It provides guidance on epidemiology, models of care, diagnosis, pre-treatment assessment, monitoring and treatment. It provides guidance on epidemiology, models of care, diagnosis, pre-treatment assessment, monitoring and treatment.

  • HCV Consensus Statement website here
  • Download the app (suitable for all Android mobile devices) from Google Play. Apple iTunes version available soon.

 

On World Hepatitis Day it’s time to talk about HIV and hepatitis C

National Association of people with HIV Australia, July 28 2016

On World Hepatitis Day, the National Association of People with HIV Australia (NAPWHA), the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations (AFAO), the Kirby Institute and Hepatitis Australia are raising awareness about HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection.

An estimated 3,000 Australians are living both with HIV and HCV. HCV is more prevalent among people with HIV than in the broader population and is a major risk for health complications in people with HIV. HIV worsens hepatitis C-related liver disease, fastens the progression to cirrhosis, and leads to higher rates of death from both liver failure and liver cancer.

  • Read more by downloading document (MS Word) here: WHDMRFINAL
  • Access NAPHWA’s website here
  • Access Hepatitis SA’s website here