Working with a transgender man who is pregnant

The Nurse Path blog, February 10., 2017

Some men have vaginas. 

It probably wouldn’t happen very often but if you are a health professional who cares for people during pregnancy and birth (ie a Midwife or Doctor), you may come across a transgender man who is pregnant.

This can be really challenging for people who may not have come across transgender people or issues. This is a guide to maybe help you in that situation. You’re welcome.

Read more here 

 

Evidence Lacking on Pelvic Exams in Asymptomatic Women

American Academy of Family Physicians, July 06, 2016 03:30 pm

In 2010, physicians performed more than 60 million pelvic examinations in the United States. And although this is a common element of physical exams, it remains unclear whether performing screening pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women significantly affects disease morbidity or mortality.

On June 28, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) tackled this issue by posting a draft recommendation statement and draft evidence review on screening asymptomatic, nonpregnant adult women for gynecologic conditions using pelvic examination.

Read more here

Late Termination of Pregnancy: RANZCOG statement

RANZCOG,  May 2016

The College recognises special circumstances where late termination of pregnancy may be regarded by the managing clinicians and the patient as the most suitable option in the particular circumstance.

This statement has been developed and reviewed by the RANZCOG Board.

Download statement (PDF) here: Late Termination of Pregnancy C-Gyn 17a_Board Approved May16

Why Reproductive Health Can Be A Special Struggle For Women With Disabilities

ThinkProgress, Oct 1, 2015 11:14am

For many women, getting a pap smear or a birth control prescription at a doctor’s office is relatively effortless. Perhaps a little uncomfortable, yes, but only temporarily — with important, beneficial results. However, not all women in need of reproductive health care find themselves able to be accommodated in a standard doctor’s office.

Women with disabilities are far less likely to make essential appointments regarding their reproductive health due to the physical and emotional hurdles they encounter in a typical clinic. From inaccessible exam tables to assumptions that disabled women are not sexually active, barriers in the medical field can leave women discouraged and uneducated about their own health.

The downloadable guide is meant specifically for women in the Chicago area — but only because it rates local hospitals and clinics for their accessibility. The rest covers more universal issues, including a patient’s accommodation rights and general information on sexually transmitted infections. A portion of the guide also specifically focuses on empowering women to stand up for themselves.

  • Read more here
  • Download Take Charge: Reproductive Health Guide (PDF) here

Patient Education Resource for Women With Gynecologic Cancers

Kanwa.org

The authors used women’s responses from individual and focus group interviews to develop the sexual health education booklet, Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: Your A–Z Guide.

The transcripts documented participants’ concerns and experiences since diagnosis regarding their sexual health.

Download the booklet (PDF) here (Please note that some government filters are blocking this page, so it may not be accessible from your workplace)

 

Testosterone plays only modest role in menopausal women’s sexual function

Science Daily, Jan 04 2015

Levels of testosterone and other naturally-occurring reproductive hormones play a limited role in driving menopausal women’s interest in sex and sexual function, according to a new study.

Read more here