Fears family violence is going undetected by psychiatrists

A survey on violence and discrimination among people with disabilities

BMC Public Health 2018 18:355

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5277-0

Abstract

Background

The aim of the study was to quantify levels of violence and discrimination among people with disabilities and analyze the effects of gender and the type and degree of disability.

Methods

The study analyzed data on self-reported violence and discrimination from a Danish national survey of 18,019 citizens, of whom 4519 reported a physical disability and 1398 reported a mental disability.

Results

Individuals with disabilities reported significantly higher levels of violence than those without. Specifically, individuals reporting a mental disability reported higher levels of violence and discrimination. Significant gender differences were found with regard to type of violence: while men with disabilities were more likely to report physical violence, women with disabilities were more likely to report major sexual violence, humiliation and discrimination. Neither severity nor visibility of disability was found to be a significant factor for risk of violence.

Conclusions

This large-scale study lends support to existing research showing that people with disabilities are at greater risk of violence than people without disabilities. Further, the study found that people with mental disabilities were significantly more likely to report all types of violence and discrimination than those with physical disabilities. The findings also show that gender is significant in explaining the type of violence experienced and the experience of discrimination.

Temporary migration and family violence: an analysis of victimisation, support and vulnerability

Monash University / InTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence, 2017

Family violence does not discriminate. However, it is known that for various subsets of the population, both the experience of family violence and the support and response options do vary, in some cases significantly. The Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence (VRCFV) acknowledged the importance of recognising these points of differentiation among key groups.

This report presents the results of the first comprehensive study of a subset of the immigrant and refugee community: temporary migrants. This group is comprised of those who are in Australia on temporary visas, which include partner-related visas, as well as working, student, visitor and other temporary visas.

Temporary migration status matters in the context of family violence because, in addition to the acknowledged levers of financial, emotional, technological, physical and sexual abuse that occur across situations of family violence, uncertainty of migration status creates additional leverage for violence and control.

This report draws on detailed cases of 300 women who sought the support service of InTouch Multicultural Centre Against Family Violence over 2015–16. The findings lay the ground for a range of potential interventions and improved responses for this group of women, on the basis of significant data that details the specific impact of migration status on the experience of family violence and access to support.

In summary, this report urges recognition of the following:

  • Temporary migration status impacts women regardless of whether or not they are eligible to apply for the family violence provision
  • On the one hand, migration status is prioritised over and above the experience of family violence. The response and support made available is dependent on migration status first and foremost, rather than risk and need in relation to experiencing family violence. This is most evident in relation to the limits on access to financial and housing support for women with temporary migration status.
  • On the other, migration status is often not factored into assessment of risk. The failure to recognise, understand and assess risk pertaining to migration status results in limited recognition of violence, abuse and coercion in all their forms, and their impact.
  • As a nation we are only just coming to grips with the complexity of family violence, the interventions required to better understand and manage risk, what is required to prevent family violence and what we need to do to ensure a comprehensive, impactful and efficient response. It is critical that we respond to family violence first and foremost, in its various manifestations across Australia, and that we recognise and support all victims equally, regardless of migration status or any other point of difference.

Access full report (PDF): Temporary Migration and Family Violence: An analysis of victimisation, vulnerability and support 

Australian report finds disturbing evidence of gender inequality

Guardian Australia, March 8th

Incorrect assumptions are being made that gender equality has been achieved despite disturbing and comprehensive evidence to the contrary, an investigation by Australia’s sex discrimination commissioner, Kate Jenkins, has found.

“There are many different voices in this, and my voice is tied to having spoken to rural women, LGBTI women, older women, women with disabilities, migrant women and Aboriginal women.”

  • Read more of article here 
  • Download the report (PDF) here
  • Download the infographic (jpg) here

 

Indian women are the largest migrant group in Australia to call family violence helpline

SBS News, 10 Feb 2017 – 12:05 PM

After Australian-born women, the largest number of women seeking help from the national family violence helpline 1800RESPECT are those born in India.

In an earlier interview, social workers Taruna Singh Chaudhry and Prateek Pahwa had also revealed that India-born women facing family violence seldom access government services, for fear of losing their visa status.

  • Read more here
  • Read article ‘Is a dowry a catalyst for domestic violence?’ here

Royal Commission into Family Violence releases releases 227 recommendations

The Royal Commission into Family Violence report was tabled in Parliament on Wednesday, 30 March 2016.

On Sunday, 22 February 2015, the Governor of Victoria appointed a Chair and two Deputy Commissioners to the Royal Commission into Family Violence.

As specified in its terms of reference, the Commission’s task was to identify the most effective ways to:
– prevent family violence
– improve early intervention so as to identify and protect those at risk
– support victims—particularly women and children—and address the impacts of violence on them
– make perpetrators accountable
– develop and refine systemic responses to family violence—including in the legal system and by police, corrections, child protection, legal and family violence support services
– better coordinate community and government responses to family violence
– evaluate and measure the success of strategies, frameworks, policies, programs and services introduced to put a stop family violence.

The Commission was asked to make practical recommendations to achieve these outcomes.

2227 recommendations were made.

Download report and recommendations (PDF) here