More needs to be done for LGBTIQ+ inclusion across Australia, ANZ research shows

ANZ, February 20, 2019

New ANZ research1 shows that almost half a million LGBTIQ+ community members (1 in every 4) in Australia are still not comfortable being their true selves and discussing their sexuality and gender identity with their loved ones or friends.

ANZ commissioned the research to mark its 13 year relationship with the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

ANZ’s Group Executive Australia, Mark Hand, who is also Chair of ANZ’s Diversity Council, said: “Being open about your whole identity is something that all Australians should be comfortable doing, and yet our research shows that this is not the case.”

Key research findings:

  • 84% of LGBTIQ+ community members believe there are still parts of Australia where it is unsafe to be LGBTIQ+. And 68% of non- LGBTIQ+ think so too.
  • 68% of Aussies support efforts to improve LGBTIQ+ equality.
  • LGBTIQ+ community members are still twice as likely to experience some form of harassment, discrimination or open prejudice because of their sexual orientation.
  • 52% of LGBTIQ+ community members would not open up about their sexuality with their manager at work.

 

 

 

 

 

Survey for Women living with HIV

napwha, femfatales, Relationships Australia South Australia, September 2018

WOMEN’S EXPERIENCE OF LIVING WITH HIV AND AGEING

This survey is the result of a collaboration between MOSAIC, NAPWHA and Femfatales. They encourage all women living with HIV, regardless of age, to be motivated to consider their health, to reflect on living with HIV, and to complete this survey so that their voices may be heard.

The feedback from this survey can be used to make positive changes in the delivery of support to women living with HIV. Please complete this survey by Friday October 26th 2018. The survey should take 10-15 minutes to complete.

Interpreter trial ensures hospitals are no longer places where Aboriginal people ‘go to die’

ABC News, ABC Kimberley

By Matt Bamford,  

Many Aboriginal people feel like hospital is a place where they “go to die” but a groundbreaking trial is underway to change that.

Interpreters have been introduced at hospitals in Western Australia’s far north to improve patients’ relationships with medical staff.

Speaking between three and nine languages each, the 22 interpreters are being stationed at five hospitals between Broome and Kununurra in a six-month State Government partnership with Aboriginal Interpreting WA.

Barriers to HIV testing for people born in Southeast Asia & sub-Saharan Africa

Curtin University,  2017

Over the past decade Australia has seen an increase in HIV notifications among people born in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South East Asia (SEA).

People born in these regions have the highest rates of HIV diagnosis by region of birth and are overrepresented in late or advanced presentations of HIV infection.

Previous research indicates that migrants from SSA and SEA attend health services in Australia regularly, but only 50% have ever tested for HIV.

This report provides a brief overview of the preliminary results from the Barriers to HIV
testing project – a qualitative research project using focus groups and in-depth interviews to explore the barriers and enablers to HIV testing among priority communities born in SSA and SEA, to better understand the factors influencing late
diagnosis.

Documentary gives insight into risks of sexual assault among Australia’s international students

ABC NewsRadio Breakfast, First posted 27/04/2018 at 09:02:46
Half a million international students, most from Asia, are enrolled to study in Australia. It’s the country’s third largest export industry, worth $18 billion.

But Australia’s reputation as a safe and sunny place to study is under threat after widespread disclosures of rape and sexual assault.

Australia: Rape on Campus follows a six-month investigation into sexual assault at the country’s universities, exploring how international students, far from home and family, are especially at risk.

It follows an Australian Human Rights Commission survey which found 1.6 percent of students experienced sexual assault in a university setting in 2015 or 2016, one in five were international students.

Journalist Aela Callan is behind the documentary and she spoke to ABC’s Fiona Ellis-Jones from Berlin.

Her documentary, Australia: Rape on Campus, will be screened on Al Jazeera.

How to redesign the vaginal speculum

Guardian, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

Cervical screening is at its lowest rate in 19 years. The Jade Goody effect, named for the increase in women attending screening after the reality TV star died of the disease in 2009, has disappeared. In 2015 and 2016, only 72.7% of eligible women went to a screening when invited. That doesn’t sound too bad, but it means 1.2 million women didn’t attend.