The battle over Essure

The Washington Post, Published on July 26, 2017

Nobody can say exactly how many women have had Essure implanted since the device went on the market in 2002. Bayer, which is headquartered in Germany, says that more than 750,000 devices have been sold worldwide and that sales “continue to grow.” 

In recent years, the [US] Food and Drug Administration has received more than 16,000 adverse-event reports about Essure. These are official reports about symptoms, hospitalizations or diagnoses that patients, doctors, hospitals or a device manufacturer believe are associated with a device.

“It seems every two or three years we have another controversy in women’s health,” says Steve Xu, a health-­policy researcher and Northwestern University dermatology resident.

 

HIV prevention drug PrEP being tested on high-risk adolescents

Sydney Morning Herald, July 21 2016

A preventative HIV drug being used by thousands of gay men in Australia is being tested on teenagers at high risk of the virus.

Studies have shown that PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) offers near complete protection against HIV if taken properly every day. Researchers are now testing it on young people in South Africa and the US.

Read more here

New approach to women’s HIV prevention being studied in U.S. teens

UAB News, June 17, 2015

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham continue efforts to find safe and effective HIV-prevention methods with a new study in female U.S. teens.

The latest study to be led by UAB, MTN-023/IPM 030, is a Phase IIa study evaluating the safety and acceptability of a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine among teenage girls ages 15-17 in the United States.

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IUD, implant contraception effective beyond FDA-approved use

Washington University School of Medicine, Public Release: 

New research indicates that hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive implants remain highly effective one year beyond their approved duration of use, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Read more here