Updated fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs)

SHINE SA, May 2019

We have recently updated our fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs). 

There has been a rise in popularity of  period tracking and fertility tracking apps, used for ‘calendar-based’ fertility awareness methods. FAMs are methods where people become aware of the signs of fertility and learn to detect when they are most likely to become pregnant.

These methods rely on the motivation, experience, commitment and cooperation of all sexual partners to be effective for contraception or conception.

The fact sheet answers question such as ‘how effective are such methods?’ and ‘what are the advantages and disadvantages?.

Reproductive coercion research – seeking GPs

The University of Melbourne, May 2019

Reproductive coercion (RC) is an under recognised form of abuse experienced by Australian women. RC refers to a group of behaviours that intend to control a woman with regards to reproduction. Contraceptive sabotage, pregnancy coercion and controlling the outcome of a pregnancy are all forms of RC and often occur alongside other forms of abuse in a relationship.

Researchers at the The University of Melbourne are undertaking a project exploring GP’s experiences responding to RC. They aim to understand how GPs identify and respond to this type of abuse. They ask that any antenatal care GPs, or GPs who prescribe medical termination of pregnancy medication to participate in a confidential interview with a member of their team. The interview can be conducted either by telephone or face to face, at a time convenient to your busy schedule. Interviews take approximately 20 minutes and all interview data will be de-identified.

Ethics ID: 1853440.

To register your interest in the project or to gain more information about the project please contact: Molly Wellington

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

National abortion data vital to safe, accessible services

MJA InSight+, Issue 10 / 18 March 2019

EXPERTS are in the dark about the extent to which abortion is contributing to Australia’s historically low teenage birth rate, prompting renewed calls for the collection of national abortion data.

In a Perspective published by the MJA, Professor Susan Sawyer, Chair of Adolescent Health at the University of Melbourne, and Dr Jennifer Marino, research fellow at the University of Melbourne, have called for the collection of abortion data in all states and territories, with national integration and analysis. They further called for publicly funded abortion clinics in all states and territories, with a feasible plan for access for people living in remote areas.

Clinical Education Forum Recording: Contraception Update

SHINE SA, November 2018

Clinicians:  SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Forum by Dr Amy Moten on the topic of Contraception.

This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers emergency contraception and new formulations of the Pill.

3 Category 2 RACGP Points can be awarded on completion of the forum.

Recording length: 1 hour 18 minutes

Almost one-third of unplanned pregnancies end in abortion

Med J Aust , Published online: 7 October 2018

ONE in four women who responded to a national telephone survey reported falling pregnant in the past 10 years without planning to do so, and 30.4% of those pregnancies ended in abortion, according to the authors of a research letter published online today by the Medical Journal of Australia.

Ten years after the only other national household survey on the subject of mistimed or unplanned pregnancy, researchers led by Professor Angela Taft, a principal research fellow at the Judith Lumley Centre at La Trobe University, undertook a national random computer-assisted telephone (mobile and landline) survey (weekdays, 9 am–8 pm) during December 2014 – May 2015. Women aged 18–45 years with adequate English were asked whether they had had an unintended pregnancy during the past 10 years, and whether any unintended pregnancy was unwanted.

Despite the availability of effective contraception in Australia, we found that, as in the United States, about half of the unintended pregnancies were in women not using contraception. Research is required to explore the reasons for not doing so, and to determine where education would be most helpful