Domestic & Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness Training

Women’s Safety Services SA, October 2019

Domestic and Family Violence: Strangulation Awareness is a specialised course in understanding and responding to this key high risk factor. The latest research will be presented as well as a practice framework for responding to disclosures.

  • Tuesday 31st October 2019
  • 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Location advised on registration (Mile End area)
  • Cost: $90**

**limited half price tickets available for full time students – contact kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au for details of how to access these tickets

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Understand the signs and symptoms of strangulation
  • Understand the physiological consequences of strangulation
  • Identify factors that indicate risk of serious harm or death in D&FV
  • Respond to disclosures of strangulation from risk and safety response model

For further information about this course, please contact the Learning and Education Coordinator: kellyb@womenssafetyservices.com.au

UNESCO paper busts myths about comprehensive sexuality education

UNESCO, 2019

Comprehensive sexuality education is an essential part of a good quality education that improves sexual and reproductive health, argues Facing the Facts, a new policy paper by the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report at UNESCO that seeks to dispel social and political resistance to sexuality education in many countries.

Globally, each year, 15 million girls marry before the age of 18, some 16 million 15-19 year olds and one million girls under 15 give birth. Young people moreover account for a third of new HIV infections among adults and across 37 low and middle-income countries, yet only approximately one third of people aged 15-24 years have comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission.

The Power of Words – Alcohol and Other Drug use

Alcohol & Drug Foundation, 2019

A resource for healthcare and other professionals

There’s power in language. By focusing on people, rather than their use of alcohol and other drugs, and by choosing words that are welcoming and inclusive, professionals working with people who use alcohol and other drugs can reduce the impact of stigma.

Stigma in the form of language and actions can make people who use, or have used alcohol and other drugs, feel unwelcome and unsafe. This can stop them from seeking the services they need, which can negatively impact their health, wellbeing, employment and social outcomes.

How to use this guide

The Power of Words contains evidence-based advice on using non-stigmatising language, and features an easy-to-navigate, colour-coded directory of alternative words and phrases to suit a range of common scenarios.

It’s important that consistent, appropriate language is used when speaking about alcohol and other drug use in all contexts, be it speaking directly to a client or through indirect communication to a broad audience.

Recognising this, the recommendations within Power of Words have been developed to be easily adopted by healthcare professionals as well as anyone working in management, people and culture, education, marketing, the media or social media.

The Power of Words has been produced by the Alcohol and Drug Foundation, Association of Participating Service Users/Self Help Addiction Resource Centre (APSU/SHARC), Department of Health and Human Services, Harm Reduction Victoria and Penington Institute, following an extensive review of evidence-based literature as well as focus groups with people with lived experience and their families.

More than half of fertility and period-tracker apps ineffective at predicting ovulation, study finds

ABC Health & Wellbeing,  17/09/2019

An Australian study of the most downloaded fertility apps has found over half didn’t perform well at predicting ovulation — which is exactly what many users are using these apps for.

The findings, by researchers at Eve Health Fertility in Brisbane in conjunction with Queensland Fertility Group, were presented at a Fertility Society of Australia conference this week in Hobart.

Sexual health and its linkages to reproductive health: an operational approach

 World Health Organization, 2017

Sexual health and reproductive health are closely linked, but crucial aspects of sexual health can be overlooked when grouped under or together with the domain of reproductive health.

In order to create broader awareness of comprehensive sexual health interventions and to ensure that sexual health and reproductive health both receive full attention in programming (including provision of health services) and research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reviewed its working definition of sexual health to create a framework for an operational approach to sexual health.

The framework, which is intended to support policy-makers and programme implementers and to provide a stronger foundation for further research and learning in sexual health, is presented and described in full in this brief.

Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper: Second Edition, 2019

Australian Women’s Health Network Inc., 2019

The Australian Women’s Health Network first published its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health Position Paper in 2012. Since then significant work has been undertaken across Australia in this area and a number of its recommendations have been implemented. This has resulted in a robust on going public conversation and a greater understanding of women’s sexual and reproductive ill health, its impact, what drives it and how best to prevent it. These gains have only been possible through continuing evidence-informed advocacy, research and practice development.

In light of the new knowledge and experience available, and changes to the political, organisational and social landscape in 2019, the Australian Women’s Health Network has updated its Women and Sexual and Reproductive Health paper to produce
this Second Edition.

This paper advocates for a rights-based approach to ensuring all women can access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care appropriate to their needs,
regardless of their location, age, sexuality, financial status and religious and cultural background. It explores seven key areas through which good sexual and reproductive
health for Australian women can be achieved.

These are:

1. promoting positive and respectful attitudes to sex and sexuality

2. developing women’s health literacy

3. increasing reproductive choice

4. facilitating women’s health throughout pregnancy and birth

5. expanding prevention and treatment of reproductive cancers and menstrual issues

6. improving prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

7. equipping the health workforce to better respond to women’s health needs.