UNESCO paper busts myths about comprehensive sexuality education

UNESCO, 2019

Comprehensive sexuality education is an essential part of a good quality education that improves sexual and reproductive health, argues Facing the Facts, a new policy paper by the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report at UNESCO that seeks to dispel social and political resistance to sexuality education in many countries.

Globally, each year, 15 million girls marry before the age of 18, some 16 million 15-19 year olds and one million girls under 15 give birth. Young people moreover account for a third of new HIV infections among adults and across 37 low and middle-income countries, yet only approximately one third of people aged 15-24 years have comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission.

Evaluating interventions related to violence against women

ANROWS, Thursday, 28th June 2018

This guide, Evaluating interventions related to violence against women, is a resource for community and health workers, clinicians, as well as educators, activists, policy-makers, academics and others. It is designed to help them evaluate interventions related to violence against women (VAW), so they can use the findings to improve services, secure funding and acknowledge the quality of work delivered by practitioners.

Key steps in evaluating interventions related to violence against women is a quick reference resource which provides a summary of the eight key steps over three stages presented in A guide to evaluating interventions related to violence against women

 

Development and validation of PozQoL: a scale to assess quality of life of PLHIV

BMC Public Health, 2018 18:527, https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5433-6

Abstract

Background

Advances in medical treatment for HIV are driving major changes in HIV policy and practice, including the encouragement of intake and adherence to HIV antiretroviral treatment (ART) by people living with HIV (PLHIV) for both personal and public health benefits. However, there is increasing recognition that achieving these goals will require a concurrent focus on the broader psychological and social wellbeing of PLHIV. Increasingly calls are being been made to incorporate a stronger focus on quality of life (QoL) of PLHIV into HIV prevention policy.

In order to achieve this goal, HIV community, support and healthcare services need a valid, short and practical way to evaluate QoL of PLHIV accessing their programs. Current QoL measures are either long, complex, restricted in their use, or expensive. To address these shortcomings, the PozQoL study aimed to develop, test and validate a short and freely available scale assessing QoL among PLHIV.

Methods

Drawing on a literature review, the prioritisation of domains and development of the initial pool of items was conducted in consultation with PLHIV community organisations in Australia. The items covered health concerns, psychological, social, and functional wellbeing. Testing involved a baseline and a follow-up survey of 465 adult Australians living with HIV. Participants were recruited through social media and various community organizations nationwide. The survey included the pilot PozQoL scale and other validated measures of health and wellbeing.

Results

Guided by an Exploratory Factor Analysis and conceptual considerations, a 13-item scale was developed. The PozQoL scale demonstrated high levels of fit in a Confirmatory Factor Analysis, very good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity with other measures that approximated different aspects of QoL.

Conclusion

The PozQoL scale has been tested in a diverse sample of adult PLHIV living in Australia, demonstrating very good reliability and validity. The insights from PLHIV and other stakeholders supported the balancing of statistical rigour and conceptual accuracy. The scale is now ready to be implemented and field-tested across a range of community, support and healthcare programs for PLHIV. This will make a significant contribution to the evaluation and enhancement of programs for PLHIV.

Sexual & Reproductive Health Resource Kit for Aboriginal young people

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales, 2018

The AH&MRC has developed a new vibrant Sexual and Reproductive Health Resource Kit for workers to use with Aboriginal young people named “DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT!”.

DOIN IT RIGHT! provides workers who work with young Aboriginal people (including non-sexual health and non-Aboriginal workers) with step by step instructions on delivering sexual and reproductive health activities appropriately.

Although the statistics are sobering, ongoing education and health promotion will assist young Aboriginal people to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. Given the decreasing age of first sexual experience, high rates of STIs and teen pregnancy, it is important that age and culturally appropriate information and education is provided to young people from an early age.

Contents:

Introduction
Introduction to Sexual and Reproductive Health ……………………………….. 6
Sexual and Reproductive Health in an Aboriginal Context …………………. 7
Aboriginal Cultural Considerations and the Worker’s Role in Sexual
and Reproductive Health Education …………………………………………………. 9
Working with Aboriginal Young People …………………………………………….. 11
Disclosure ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
Organisational Philosophy, Policies and Procedures ………………………… 14
How to Generate Conversations ……………………………………………………….. 15
How to use this Kit …………………………………………………………………………… 19
Welcome to Country and Acknowledgment of Country………………………. 21
Group Agreement …………………………………………………………………………….. 23
Opportunity for Anonymous Questions to be Asked Safely………………… 24

1 Looking After Me
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 27
Changes When Growing Up
Changing Bodies …………………………………………………………………….. 28
Knowing Your Reproductive System and How It All Works ………. 33

2 My Sexuality and How I Feel About Myself

Section Introduction………………………………………………………………………….. 47
Sexuality and me
Sexuality and Sexual Diversity. Step Forward, Step Back ………….. 48
Myths and Stereotypes about Sexuality ……………………………………. 63
Sexuality and Popular Culture ………………………………………………….. 67
Self Esteem
Self Esteem. I Like Me! …………………………………………………………….. 69

3 Sex, Pregnancy and Keeping Safe
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 76
Sexual Health – What’s Safe and What’s Not
Healthy Vs Unhealthy ………………………………………………………………. 77
High Risk, Low Risk, No Risk …………………………………………………… 87
Sexually Transmissible Infection Information Sheets ………………… 97
Safer Sex STI & Pregnancy Prevention
Contraception and Safer Sex. Methods and Myths ……………………. 113
Using a Condom – DOIN ‘IT’ RIGHT! …………………………………………. 118
Contraception and Safer Sex Information Sheets ……………………… 125

4 Coming to a Decision
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 142
Sexual and Other Important Decisions
What’s Most Important …………………………………………………………….. 143
Values and Decisions ………………………………………………………………. 152
Decision Tree and Me ………………………………………………………………. 155
I Can Say No!……………………………………………………………………………. 159
What’s Drugs Got To Do With It?
Are You Thinking What I’m Thinking? ………………………………………. 168
Sex, Drugs and Your Choices ………………………………………………….. 175

5 Evaluation
Section Introduction …………………………………………………………………………. 180
What is evaluation …………………………………………………………………… 181
Types of program evaluation …………………………………………………… 182
Planning your evaluation …………………………………………………………. 183
Data collection methods ………………………………………………………….. 185
Documenting activities ……………………………………………………………. 189
Participant feedback ………………………………………………………………… 191
Further evaluation resources …………………………………………………… 192

6 Additional Resources and Information Pages
Section Introduction ………………………………………………………………………… 194
Glossary of Terms ……………………………………………………………………………. 195
Resources and Organisation Contact Details ……………………………………. 202
Broad Sexual and Reproductive Health Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 204
Information and Resources for Parents and Carers…………………… 208
Puberty Information and Resources …………………………………………. 209
Contraceptives Information and Resources ……………………………… 211
Pregnancy and Parenting Information and Resources……………….. 213
Sexually Transmissible Infections Information and Resources…… 215
Sexting Information and Resources…………………………………………… 219
Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 220
Alcohol and Other Drugs Information and Resources ……………….. 221
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer (LGBTIQ)
and Same Sex Couples Information and Resources…………………… 224
Blood Borne Viruses: HIV and Hepatitis Information and
Resources……………………………………………………………………………….. 226
Social Emotional Wellbeing Health Information and Resources…. 229
Legal Information and Resources………………………………………………. 231
References ………………………………………………………………………………………. 233

 

Making sexual consent matter: one-off courses are unlikely to help

The Conversation, February 15, 2018 6.05am AEDT

In the wake of the findings of the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) 2017 national report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities, a number of universities have introduced mandatory courses on sexual consent for new students.

Of all students who participated in the AHRC inquiry, 26% experienced some form of sexual harassment in a university setting in 2016. Just over half had experienced sexual harassment at least once in the year prior to the survey.

Evidence-Informed Public Health: resources and information

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (Canada), 2017

Evidence-Informed Public Health is the process of distilling and disseminating the best available evidence from research, context and experience, and using that evidence to inform and improve public health practice and policy.

Put simply, it means finding, using and sharing what works in public health.

Canada’s NCCMT has a range of tools and resources on Evidence-Informed Public Health,  from factsheets to online learning modules.

  • Access EIPH resources here