Association between adolescent condom use and individual & environmental resilience protective factors

Aust NZ J Public Health.
2018; 42:230-3; doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12744
Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Individual and environmental resilience protective factors are suggested to be associated with adolescent condom use; however, previous studies have not comprehensively examined such associations. This study aimed to determine the associations between condom use, and numerous individual and environmental resilience protective factors in sexually active Australian adolescents.

METHODS:

Participants were Grade 10 students attending 28 Australian government high schools (n=1,688). An online survey (2011) collected data regarding: sexual intercourse (past year), condom use and 14 individual and environmental resilience protective factors. Multivariable backward stepwise logistic regression models examined associations between student condom use and protective factors (total, subscale).

RESULTS:

Only total environmental protective factors remained in the final total score model; students with higher total environmental protective factors scores were 2.59 times more likely to always use a condom(95%CI:1.80-3.74). Only three of 14 protective factor subscales were associated with a higher likelihood of always using a condom in the final subscale model (individual: goals/aspirations; environmental: community participation, pro-social peers).

CONCLUSIONS:

Total environmental and three protective factor subscales demonstrated prominent associations with consistent use of condoms in sexually active adolescents. Implications for public health: Consideration of particular resilience protective factors in adolescent sexual risk behaviour prevention, such as condom use, is warranted.

How we inherit masculine and feminine behaviours: a new idea about environment and genes

The Conversation, August 18, 2017 3.22pm AEST

What if thousands of years of gendered environments actually reduced the need to develop genetic mechanisms to ensure gender differences? This is the idea we suggest in our new paper.

Advances in evolutionary biology recognise that offspring don’t just inherit genes. They also reliably inherit all kinds of resources: a particular ecology, a nest, parents and peers. And it appears that these stable environmental factors can help ensure the reliable reproduction of a trait across generations.

Improving cultural understanding and engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

1800RESPECT, July 2017

This article is adapted from Craig Rigney’s Workers Webinar presentation, Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Contents:

  • What is cultural understanding?
  • Am I using a cultural lens?
  • Engagement strategies
  • What is family or lateral violence?
  • Next steps

Further reading and related tools:

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing

DSCI & SA Health, 2016

An atlas of six South Australian communities: Mapping the influences on community wellbeing was produced for the South Australian Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) and the Department for Health and Ageing (SA Health).

Over the last three decades, numerous reports and studies have highlighted substantial variations in the wellbeing across the South Australian population, and the gaps between those who are doing well, and those who are not. These differences, or ‘inequalities’, are readily apparent across Adelaide, and our rural and remote communities, as they are in other areas of Australia.

This atlas describes the extent and significance of inequalities in individual and community wellbeing, particularly those associated with wider social and economic influences; and points to areas where the impacts of disadvantage across the lifespan, and, in many cases across generations, need to be addressed.

The atlas includes a number of communities in Adelaide and rural and remote parts of the State, identified by these Departments (DCIS and SA Health):

  • Playford and Salisbury in the outer north,
  • Onkaparinga, in the outer south;
  • Those in Regional South Australia are the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Aboriginal Community, Ceduna and Peterborough.

The information, presented as a series of indicators, highlights these inequalities and draws attention to the influence of social, economic and environmental factors on health and wellbeing. The ensuing picture is one of significant differences in outcomes in these communities, compared with similarly located areas.

Download atlas (PDF) here

‘Gay genes’: science is on the right track, we’re born this way. Let’s deal with it.