Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of existing needle and syringe programmes in preventing hepatitis C transmission in PWID

Drug and Alcohol Findings (UK), 2019

What would happen to rates of infection with hepatitis C if we closed down all the needle exchanges? Research has established that needle/syringe programmes are a cost-effective way to reduce spread of HIV, but just two studies have considered the same issue in relation to hepatitis C.

In three UK municipalities, the answers were predicted to be more infections, lost low-cost opportunities to improve and save lives, and in two of the areas, greater health-related costs overall. Conclusion was that these services are among the best investments UK health services can make.

Australian sex education isn’t diverse enough. Here’s why we should follow England’s lead.

The Conversation, 7 August 2018

By David Rhodes, Senior Lecturer, School of Education, Edith Cowan University

How children are taught about sex, relationships and sexuality at school is shaping up to be a political hot potato in Australia (again).

It’s already been slated to be an issue in the Victorian state elections later this year. That’s just a short time from being on the agenda during the same-sex marriage debate.

Now a radical shift in how children in England are taught about sex, relationships and sexuality promises to be the biggest reform of its kind in nearly 20 years. Here’s what Australia can learn from the new English system.

 

Syphilis, Gonorrhea Cases Show Sharp Increase In England Following STI Budget Cuts

Tech Times, 6 July 2016, 11:39 am EDT

Cases of syphilis and gonorrhea in the United Kingdom soared following budget cuts on sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing.

Public Health England (PHE) has revealed that in 2015, there were 434,456 cases of STIs reported. Gonorrhea was diagnosed in 41,1932 people, which is a 10 percent spike compared to figures in 2014. On the other hand, syphilis diagnoses reached a total of 5,288 cases, which represents a 76 percent surge since 2012.

  • Read more here
  • Read the PHE report (PDF, 27 pages) here

Very high levels of chemsex and ‘slamsex’ seen in HIV-positive men attending UK HIV clinics

nam/aidsmap, 24 February 2016

A survey of HIV-positive patients attending 30 HIV clinics in England and Wales has found that nearly a third (29%) of gay male patients reported engaging in ‘chemsex’ (defined by the researchers as “The use of drugs to increase disinhibition and arousal”) in the past year and that one in 10 reported ‘slamsex’ (injecting – or being injected with – the drugs).

Read more here