Purruna Miyurna 2-day health summit for ATSI students

SHINE SA, 25.5.2017

PURRUNA MIYURNA: Healthy People

Presented by SHINE SA’s Yarning On program, Purruna Miyurna is a 2-day health
summit for ATSI students in years 9–12 in high schools and education programs
within southern Adelaide.

This interactive and hands-on summit will cover:
• Respectful relationships
• Domestic violence
• Sexual health
• Self-worth and cultural identity

The objective of the summit is to provide an opportunity for our students to gain
information and understanding on the topic of “Healthy Relationships”, what a
healthy relationship looks like, feels like and sounds like.
The summit will be culturally safe and LGBTIQ inclusive.

Our aim is to start a conversation among our young people, educate and
share information in order to break down barriers and challenge the perceived
stereotypes/ideas of Aboriginal people in relationships.

The summit will include ActNow Theatre presenting “Speak out”. This is an interactive theatre performance tackling homophobia in high schools. Presented by young professional actors and a facilitator, “Speak Out” explores various forms of homophobia and the effect it has, while providing opportunities and a safe space to develop strategies to respond to homophobia.

Local Kaurna Narrunga man Jack Buckskin will also be presenting during the summit, facilitating a cultural identity workshop, strengthening the cultural knowledge of our Aboriginal young people and their understanding of cultural identity and self-respect.

COST: $50 per student, includes a summit shirt, catering and an information bag

VENUE: Hopgood Theatre, Ramsay Place, Noarlunga Centre

REGISTRATION: Go to: www.shinesa.org.au/events/purruna-miyurna/
Limited spaces available. Registration closes 1 June 2017.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Jessica Wishart, SHINE SA, 8300 5344
15–16 JUNE 2017

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Download flyer (PDF): Health Summit Purruna Miyurna

No excuses: government releases new guidelines on sexist language

The Age, April 10

“Boys will be boys.” “He’s picking on you because he likes you.” “Don’t throw like a girl.”

These are the kinds of phrases that the Australian government is attempting to eradicate with a new tool in its anti-violence campaign aimed at educators and influencers of young people.

  • Read more here 
  • Download No Excuses Guideline (PDF) here 

CALD Women’s Forum on 20th May 2016

“CALD Women in the 21st century Stand Up, Speak Out & Be heard!”

CALD Women’s Forum on 20th May 2016

This  an event that the Women’s Legal Service is working on, in collaboration with the Migrant Women’s Lobby Group.

The forum focuses on providing CALD women with the knowledge and empowerment that is needed to combat issues they may face on the day to day basis. it also allows women the right to share their views or ask any questions that they may be dealing with in this day and age.

CALD Women are invited to participate and contribute to the forum around issues that impact on our lives. Topics include: training, employability, health and more.

Date: Friday, 20th May 2016
Time: 10.00 am to 4.00 pm
Venue: Hellenic Macedonian Cultural Centre, 94 Henley Beach Road, Mile End SA 5031

This is a FREE event

Registration for catering purposes:
Eventbrite http://cald-women.eventbrite.com.au

Email here or Phone: 08 8241 9900

Please feel free to share the flyer (link below) around your networks, and if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to contact Didi Ngor at the Women’s Legal Service on 8231-8929 or via this email

Invitation to CALD Womens Forum

Why Reproductive Health Can Be A Special Struggle For Women With Disabilities

ThinkProgress, Oct 1, 2015 11:14am

For many women, getting a pap smear or a birth control prescription at a doctor’s office is relatively effortless. Perhaps a little uncomfortable, yes, but only temporarily — with important, beneficial results. However, not all women in need of reproductive health care find themselves able to be accommodated in a standard doctor’s office.

Women with disabilities are far less likely to make essential appointments regarding their reproductive health due to the physical and emotional hurdles they encounter in a typical clinic. From inaccessible exam tables to assumptions that disabled women are not sexually active, barriers in the medical field can leave women discouraged and uneducated about their own health.

The downloadable guide is meant specifically for women in the Chicago area — but only because it rates local hospitals and clinics for their accessibility. The rest covers more universal issues, including a patient’s accommodation rights and general information on sexually transmitted infections. A portion of the guide also specifically focuses on empowering women to stand up for themselves.

  • Read more here
  • Download Take Charge: Reproductive Health Guide (PDF) here