Changes to Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Distribution

SHINE SA,  

SHINE SA will now temporarily provide a full 28-day supply of Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) medication in place of the usual five-day starter pack. This measure has been put in place with the assistance of SA Health to help limit movement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior to the pandemic, clients received a five-day HIV PEP starter pack and then the remaining medication after a follow-up appointment. Clients can now call SHINE SA for a telehealth appointment where our team will guide clients through the process including supply of the medications and blood tests. Follow-up care arrangements will remain in place.

What is PEP?

PEP is a four week long course of medication taken to reduce the risk of HIV infection. It needs to be initiated within 72 hours of possible contact with HIV in order to help prevent the chance of infection. Exposure can occur through unprotected sex or the sharing of needles and other injection equipment.

It’s important that PEP is accessed as soon as possible after you think you may been exposed to HIV. If you are outside of the time-frame you can still contact your local GP or SHINE SA for further assistance.

What are the most common reasons for needing PEP?

  • Sex without a condom or sex where a condom broke or slipped off, with a person who has, or might have, HIV.
  • Sharing needles or syringes with a person who has, or might have, HIV.

How can I find out more?

  • The PEP Hotline is available 24 hours a day on 1800 022 026. The Registered Nurse on the PEP hotline will help assess your needs and indicate where to access PEP near you.
  • To speak to SHINE SA about accessing PEP call 8300 5300.
  • To learn more about PEP you can visit the SAMESH website or call 7099 5300.

From: https://www.shinesa.org.au/changes-to-pep/

World Medical Association updates advice on medically indicated termination of pregnancy

Australian Medical Association, October 21, 2018

Revised advice to physicians on medically indicated termination of pregnancy has been issued by the World Medical Association.

At its recent annual General Assembly in Reykjavik, the WMA reiterated that where the law allows medically indicated termination of pregnancy to be performed, the procedure should be carried out by a competent physician.

However, it agreed that in extreme cases it could be performed by another qualified health care worker. An extreme case would be a situation where only an abortion would save the life of the mother and no physician was available, as might occur in many parts of the world. This amends previous WMA advice from 2006 that only physicians should undertake such procedures.

SHINE SA services over the holiday season 2017/18

All SHINE SA sites will be closed from 12 PM Friday December 22nd, reopening on January 2nd at the usual times. This includes Woodville, Davoren Park, Hyde Street and Noarlunga, as well as the SAMESH program.

This also includes our weekly Gilles Plains clinic (reopening Thursday 4th) and our Rapido weekly clinic for rapid HIV testing (reopening Monday 8th).

SASHA will be taking a break until 16th January.

All of us at SHINE SA would like to wish you a safe and peaceful festive season and a happy new year for 2018.

We do acknowledge that this can be a difficult and stressful time for some.

For urgent help during this time:

  • If it is an emergency, phone 000 (Police, Ambulance or Fire Service).
  • If you are in crisis, or the person you are supporting is in crisis, the following free services can provide immediate support:

* Lifeline: 13 11 14 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
* Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
* Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) This service is available for kids and young people (up to 25 years of age).
*  QLife: 1800 184 527 (3pm to midnight) QLife is a counselling and referral service for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and/or intersex (LGBTI).
* Mental Health Triage Service: 13 14 65 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week

If you suspect HIV exposure:

  • the PEP hotline never closes, call 1800 022 226

If you require Emergency Contraception (must be within 5 days of unprotected intercourse, the sooner the better)

Thank you to all SASHA subscribers and browsers for your support in 2017! 

Naloxone: Victoria’s rising death rate prompts calls to relax restrictions on overdose ‘antidote’

ABC news, Posted 13.12.16 

The high rate of overdose deaths in Victoria has prompted calls for a change in regulations around overdose ‘antidote’ Naloxone.

Naloxone is used to reverse the effects of opioids like heroin and oxycodone but under Australian law it can only be dispensed over the counter by a doctor or pharmacist.

The stigma can mean some users avoid asking for the drug, despite the enormous rate of overdose deaths in Victoria every year, particularly in rural or regional areas.

Read more here 

Heroin deaths spike as investigations begin into ‘strong batch’ in SA

ABC News, 23rd August 2016

Toxicologists have begun investigating a spike in heroin-related deaths as emergency and health services are put on high alert in South Australia.

Read more here

Patient choice in opt-in, active choice, and opt-out HIV screening: an RCT

BMJ 2016; 352 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h6895 (Published 19 January 2016)

What is already known on this topic

  • Patients’ preferences are a hallmark of patient centered care, but little is known about how wording of offers of testing can influence perceived preferences

  • Opt-in and opt-out HIV testing have not been compared in a randomized controlled setting

  • US guidelines endorse opt-out HIV testing, and Europe has seen a trend toward this testing scheme

What this study adds

  • Opt-in and opt-out defaults had statistically and clinically significant effects on the likelihood of patients accepting tests

  • Patients reporting risk factors were more likely to accept testing in each testing regimen than were patients reporting no risk factors

  • Active choice is a distinct test regimen, with test acceptance patterns that may best approximate patients’ true preferences