Parents get new tools to challenge gender stereotypes

Our Watch, 07 March 2018

A digital campaign aimed at helping parents challenge limiting gender stereotypes and promote equality when interacting with their children has just been launched.

The #BecauseWhy campaign encourages parents to view stereotypes often expressed through language, activity choices and media portrayals from a child’s perspective and question why certain limitations are placed on boys and girls.

The campaign website offers a collection of videos and resources to help parents identify and counter rigid stereotypes in their children’s daily lives.

Making sexual consent matter: one-off courses are unlikely to help

The Conversation, February 15, 2018 6.05am AEDT

In the wake of the findings of the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) 2017 national report on sexual assault and sexual harassment at Australian universities, a number of universities have introduced mandatory courses on sexual consent for new students.

Of all students who participated in the AHRC inquiry, 26% experienced some form of sexual harassment in a university setting in 2016. Just over half had experienced sexual harassment at least once in the year prior to the survey.

Child Living with HIV Maintains Remission Without Drugs Since 2008

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), July 24, 2017

A nine-year-old South African child who was diagnosed with HIV infection at one month of age and received anti-HIV treatment during infancy has suppressed the virus without anti-HIV drugs for eight and a half years, scientists reported today at the 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science in Paris. This case appears to be the third reported instance of sustained HIV remission in a child after early, limited anti-HIV treatment.

HPV vaccination reduces abnormal Pap tests

Reuters, Wed August 6, 2016 1:58pm EDT

Young women who get the recommended three doses of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine have fewer abnormal Pap tests than unvaccinated women and women who only get two doses, Canadian researchers say.

Read more here

 

LGB adults more likely to report impaired physical & mental health, substance use, due to discrimination stressors

JAMA Intern Med. Published online June 27, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3432

New national data suggest lesbian, gay and bisexual adults were more likely to report impaired physical and mental health and heavy drinking and smoking, which may be the result of stressors they experience because of discrimination, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

The study objective was to compare health and health risk factors between LGB adults and heterosexual adults in the United States.

This study supports prior research finding substantial health disparities for LGB adults in the United States, potentially due to the stressors that LGB people experience as a result of interpersonal and structural discrimination. In screening for health issues, clinicians should be sensitive to the needs of sexual minority patients.

  • Access journal paper (free full text) here

Boy, girl or …? Dilemmas when sexual development is atypical

The Conversation, March 11, 2016 6.19am AEDT

Some babies are born with a genetic variant that leads to atypical sexual development. It can result in the child being neither a typical boy nor girl.

Estimates of this occurring range from one in 1,500 or 2,000 births, to 4% of all births, depending on what definitions are used.

Read more here