Second HOW2 course announced for 2019

SHINE SA, July 2019

Our first course filled up, and as a result we are pleased to announce a second HOW2 course for this year! The HOW2 CREATE LGBTI INCLUSIVE SERVICES training program is an in-depth, practical program which helps organisations reach their inclusivity goals and potentially achieve accreditation as an inclusive service.

Delivered over 4 separate days, interspersed with time to implement practical improvements to your workplace’s inclusivity, this program will provide immediate benefits to your organisation.

The program is based on a set of 6 national standards developed by Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV), in conjunction with QIP (Quality, Innovation & Performance), known as Rainbow Tick Accreditation. SHINE SA was the first South Australian organisation to be awarded Rainbow Tick accreditation for LGBTI inclusive practice and is proud to support other organisations to create safer and more inclusive workplaces and services.

**If you are a not-for-profit or community youth-focused service you may qualify for the Department of Human Services Training subsidy.

DATES (Participants are required to attend all 4 sessions):

First session: Friday 30 August  2019
Second session: Friday 4 October 2019
Third session: Friday 8 November 2019
Final session: Friday 13 December 2019

TIME: 9:00am – 2:00pm

WHERE: SHINE SA @ Woodville

 

 

 

 

 

The health and wellbeing of Australian lesbian, gay and bisexual people: a systematic assessment

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I04 June 2019

https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12855

Abstract

Objective: This study revisits disparities in health and wellbeing by sexual identity in Australia, identifying which domains demand priority policy intervention, documenting differences between gay/lesbian vs. bisexual populations, and examining change over time in the relative health and wellbeing of sexual minorities.

Method: I fitted multivariable ordinary least squares and random‐effect panel regression models on 20 outcomes to compare the health and wellbeing of heterosexual, gay/lesbian and bisexual people, using 2012/2016 data from a national probability sample – the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey.

Results: I found strong associations between sexual minority identities and most health and wellbeing outcomes. These were comparatively larger for: role‐emotional health, mental health and general health; bisexual compared to gay/lesbian people; and minority women compared to minority men. I found no change over time in the relative health and wellbeing outcomes of gay/lesbian people, but evidence of worsening circumstances among bisexual people.

Conclusion: There are important disparities in the health and wellbeing profiles of different sexual minority populations in Australia, based on sex (male vs. female), sexual identity (gay/lesbian vs. bisexual), and observation time (2012 vs. 2016).

Implications for public health: Sexual identity remains an important marker of risk for health and wellbeing outcomes within Australia, underscoring the importance of fully integrating sexual identity in health policy and practice.

Is the world becoming more gay-friendly?

via BBC 29/05/2019

When Taiwan became the first place in Asia to legalise same-sex unions, hundreds of gay people marked the occasion by registering to marry.

It marked a significant change on the island, where the majority of people only relatively recently became supportive of same-sex relationships.

In many other places there has also been a shift – often a rapid one – towards more liberal attitudes. But these changes do not always mean full equality.

HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

2019 Community Survey Results from The South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA)

SARAA, 1 April 2019

The South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA) has analysed the results of their community survey and compiled them into a summary.

Some key findings:

  • Only 60% of respondents felt comfortable disclosing their gender and/or their
    sexual orientation when accessing services.
  • When accessing services, 37.7% of respondents felt that they didn’t receive
    sufficient and meaningful information to inform decision making.
  • 64% felt that the current level of LGBTIQ+ specific services did not
    adequately meet their needs.
  • This includes a lack of services and supports to rural and remote
    communities, a lack of services and supports for older LGBTIQ+ people
    and cuts to vital services for LGBTIQ+ people.
  • More support for trans people to access necessary medical services.

 

STIs in remote Australia

ABC Health Report, Monday 18 March 2019 5:45 PM

Leading Aboriginal researcher Associate Professor James Ward* is calling for action in remote Australia to deal with a preventable epidemic of sexually transmissible infections — including syphilis — in a population that’s no more sexually active than non-Indigenous people of the same age.  

He joined Dr Norman Swan’s Health Report on ABC RN.

Later this month James will present to the National Rural Health Conference about addressing sexually transmitted infections in remote Australia.

*James Ward is Associate Professor, Flinders University; & Head of Infectious Diseases Research, Aboriginal Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute.