New booklet: Vulva & vaginal irritation

Jean Hailes, Last updated 05 May 2017

Jean Hailes has just released a new patient information booklet: The vulva: irritation, diagnosis & treatment. 

Contents:

  • What is normal?
  • Causes of vulva irritation
  • Management & treatment
  • Dryness
  • ‘Good bacteria’ versus ‘bad bacteria’ in the vagina
  • Other natural therapies
  • Irritation
  • Diagnosis
  • Secretions or discharge
  • Odour
  • Probiotics
  • What is the vulva?

Download booklet (PDF) here 

 

 

First medical study on chest binding recently published

The first medical study on chest binding transgender and non-binary people was published last year. 

The researchers hope that the study will provide an initial roadmap for change, educating physicians on the benefits and impacts of binding and allowing those who bind to take charge of their health. They scoured peer-reviewed literature and information from health clinics, LGBTQ organizations, and online community resources, coming up with 28 potential health outcomes from binding. 1,800 respondents answered an online survey with questions ranging from how often they bound, what they used to bind their chests with, and their gender identity.

  • Read more about the study and chest-binding here 
  • Read study abstract here (for full text, see your librarian)

Tinea genitalis: a new entity of sexually transmitted infection?

Sex Transm Infect 2015;91:493-496 doi:10.1136/sextrans-2015-052036

Case series and review of the literature

Abstract:

Objective Investigation on recent cases of tinea genitalis after travelling to South East Asia.

Methods Patients with tinea in the genital region, which emerged after sex in South East Asia, underwent further assessment including microscopy, cultures and DNA analyses.

Results The case series includes seven patients. In six patients, Trichophyton interdigitale (former Trichophyton mentagrophytes) was detected. Three patients suffered from a severe inflammatory reaction of the soft tissue and two of them needed hospitalisation due to severe pain. In four patients, cicatrising healing was noticed. Five patients were declared incapacitated for work.

Conclusions Sexual activity should be considered as a potentially important and previously underappreciated means of transmission of T. interdigitale. To avoid irreversible scarring alopecia, prompt initiation of antifungal treatment is essential and adequate isolation and identification of the pathogen is mandatory.

Read article here (open access, PDF version optional)