A survey on violence and discrimination among people with disabilities

BMC Public Health 2018 18:355

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5277-0

Abstract

Background

The aim of the study was to quantify levels of violence and discrimination among people with disabilities and analyze the effects of gender and the type and degree of disability.

Methods

The study analyzed data on self-reported violence and discrimination from a Danish national survey of 18,019 citizens, of whom 4519 reported a physical disability and 1398 reported a mental disability.

Results

Individuals with disabilities reported significantly higher levels of violence than those without. Specifically, individuals reporting a mental disability reported higher levels of violence and discrimination. Significant gender differences were found with regard to type of violence: while men with disabilities were more likely to report physical violence, women with disabilities were more likely to report major sexual violence, humiliation and discrimination. Neither severity nor visibility of disability was found to be a significant factor for risk of violence.

Conclusions

This large-scale study lends support to existing research showing that people with disabilities are at greater risk of violence than people without disabilities. Further, the study found that people with mental disabilities were significantly more likely to report all types of violence and discrimination than those with physical disabilities. The findings also show that gender is significant in explaining the type of violence experienced and the experience of discrimination.

HPV May Cause A Genital Infection That Leads To Cancer, And Not Just Cervical

Medical Daily, Jul 2, 2016 04:40 PM

The authors of a new study published in Cancer, Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention looked at 34 years of data on nearly 3 million women. And it turns out, women with HPV are at risk for more than cervical cancer.

The study’s findings suggest that women with HPV are at long-lasting risk for anogenital cancers too. Lead study author Susanne Krüger Kjær believes that preventing HPV infection from occurring in the first place may be the best way to drive down subsequent cancer rates.

  • Read more of press release here
  • Access article abstract here

Let’s talk about sex: why do we need good sex education? – podcast transcript

The Guardian, Wednesday 15 June 2016

There are 1.8 billion people aged 10 to 24 today, but how many of those are getting comprehensive sexuality education? And why, in 2016, are there still so many taboos around sex? Liz Ford discusses what young people should be taught, when sex education should start and asks, what does comprehensive sexuality education actually mean?

She visits the Women Deliver Conference in Denmark, where 5,000 delegates meet to discuss the reproductive health, rights and wellbeing of women and girls. There, she speaks to 18-year-old Dennis Glasgow, a peer educator from the Guyana Responsible Parenthood Association, who discusses the importance of diminishing the myths around sex by talking about it.

Doortje Braeken, senior adviser on adolescents and young people at the International Planned Parenthood Federation, reveals that 66% of girls don’t know what menstruation is when they have their first period.

Lucy Emmerson is coordinator of the UK’s Sex Education Forum. She says that, with good quality sex and relationship education from a trained educator, young people are less likely to start having sex at a young age, and less likely to become teenage parents. The Sex Education Forum has developed a curriculum framework that shows the kind of questions relevant to children at each stage of their development.

Remmy Shawa helps manage sex and reproductive health at Sonke Gender Justice in South Africa. He talks about the difficulties for parents in being open with children about sexuality when they can’t find the language to talk about it.

Anne Philpott, founder of The Pleasure Project, emphasises the need to convey in public health messages that sex is about enjoyment. She talks about the ease of young people’s access to pornography – essentially bad sex education, she says – and the need to discuss the stereotypes it presents, so that young people understand it’s not real life. And, Philpott says, with AIDS still the highest killer of adolescent girls in Africa, effectively spreading the message of safe sex is a top priority.

  • Read transcript here
  • Listen to podcast here

Sexual behaviour among young Danes aged 15–29 years

Sex Transm Infect 2015;91:171-177 

Sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies occur at high rates among youth. Understanding sexual behaviour is essential for planning and implementing future effective preventive interventions. The present study examines the sexual behaviour in the general Danish population aged 15–29 years using the core indicators recommended by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

The findings call for interventions addressing the use of appropriate contraception at sexual debut and at last sexual encounter; this seems particularly important when the sexual partner is a casual partner.

Read article (open access) here

Australia performs best in HIV treatment cascade – 62% with undetectable viral load

nam, 04 November 2014

Australia and northern European countries are doing far better than North America at retaining people living with HIV in care and achieving viral suppression, according to a comprehensive survey of `treatment cascades` in high-income countries presented on Tuesday at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection in Glasgow.

Read more here