Launching the Australian Trans and Gender Diverse Sexual Health Survey

 Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney, November 5 2018

Virtually nothing is known about the sexual lives of trans and gender diverse people living in Australia. A new survey coordinated by the Kirby Institute at UNSW Sydney in collaboration with community advocates from across Australia will provide the first national data on topics related to sex and romance among Australia’s trans and gender diverse communities.

“This trans-led research is the first of its kind in Australia and we need as many people from our community as possible to do the survey and to encourage their trans and gender diverse mates to do it too,” said Teddy Cook from the Peer Advocacy Network for the Sexual Health of Trans Masculinities (‘PASH.tm’) and one of the study’s chief investigators.reserese

The online survey covers a diverse range of topics including online and offline dating, sexual health care, pleasure and satisfaction and marriage. The data from the survey will be used to inform service delivery, guide public policy, and otherwise support the sexual well-being of trans and gender diverse people.

As another of the study’s chief investigators, Liz Duck-Chong, explained: “sexual health isn’t just about testing, it has to be about talking. We have designed this survey to take a big-picture look at the experiences and desires of people who are often assumed to not have them at all.”

Although international research suggests that trans and gender diverse people have sexual lives and experiences that are unique from their cisgender peers, very little research has looked at this in detail in Australia or overseas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baby boomers re-entering dating game more vulnerable to STIs

PM, ABC radio, 18/01/2018

Family Planning New South Wales surveyed 2,339 heterosexual men who were using an online dating service in 2014.

The survey found men aged 50 or older were less likely to use condoms and more likely than younger men to think that condoms reduced sexual interest.

The survey also found 49 per cent of men over 60 did not know that Australia’s most prevalent sexually transmitted infection (STI), chlamydia, often does not cause any symptoms.

Consent flowchart – education tool

Planned Parenthood Toronto, [2015?]

The consent flowchart has been designed to help young people understand how consent is negotiated.

People follow the instructional bubbles until they reach the end. They can continue each time they choose a consent option. If they choose an option where consent is not given, they land on an orange bubble and must go back to the beginning and start over. 

Yellow bubbles show different possible reposes to lack of consent.

Consent is not just about sex, as this chart shows.

Queering Sex Ed (QSE), which created this resource, is a project at Planned Parenthood Toronto, developing sex ed resources with and for LGBTQ youth. They create resources which are:

 

  • Inclusive
  • Accessible
  • Sex-positive
  • Includes trans* and cis people
  • Asexual positive
  • Doesn’t assume identity
  • Youth positive
  • Body positive
  • Empowering, not fear/shame based
  • Opens rather than closes possibilities
  • Accounts for pleasure
  • Awesome

Download the consent flowchart (PDF) here 

Survey of teen dating violence among US high school students

Science Daily, March 2, 2015

A survey of US high school students suggests that 1 in 5 female students and 1 in 10 male students who date have experienced some form of teen dating violence (TDV) during the past 12 months.

Read more here

Brazilian health ministry uses dating apps to prevent HIV

Reuters, Tuesday, February 10, 2015 – 01:27

Brazil’s health ministry is using Tinder and Hornet to target young people that use smartphone apps to meet sexual partners in a newly launched campaign to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS in the country. The ministry created profiles as people interested in having sex without condoms.

Read more or watch video here

 

Preventing Teen Dating Violence: Comprehensive Education Needed (USA)

Allison Yates, Kinsey Institute

11 August, 2014

Teen dating violence, according to the Center For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  is “the physical, sexual, or psychological/emotional violence within a dating relationship, as well as stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and may occur between a current or former dating partner.”
Teen dating violence, according to the Center For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  is “the physical, sexual, or psychological/emotional violence within a dating relationship, as well as stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and may occur between a current or former dating partner.” – See more at: http://kinseyconfidential.org/preventing-teen-dating-violence-early-comprehensive-education/#sthash.6o0TYS4Y.dpuf