Analysis of cervical cancer and abnormality outcomes in an era of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Release Date: 

This is the third report from an Australian-first project, combining screening, cancer, death, and HPV vaccination data to demonstrate the effects of screening and HPV vaccination on cervical cancer, precancerous abnormalities and cervical screening behaviour.

Screen-detected cervical cancers were less likely to cause death than those diagnosed in never-screened women, and HPV-vaccinated women were more likely to participate in cervical screening, and less likely to have a high-grade abnormality.

 

Cervical Screening Update recording now available!

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SHINE SA, August 2018

SHINE SA is proud to present our pilot Clinical Education Forum recording. This recording is available free of charge,  and access is limited to three months only.

Topic: Cervical Screening Update

Presenters: Megan van Zanten & Dr Amy Moten

The forum ensures your knowledge of the National Cervical Screening Renewed Guidelines is accurate and in line with best practice principles.

  • To watch the recording click the link here and set up a free account/sign in. Under Course Categories click Clinical Education to find the course, and then click Enrol Me. You can now watch the recording.

Changes to cervical screening in Australia, new guidelines

Cancer Screening, Australian Government,  Page last updated: 01 March 2017

Based on new evidence and better technology, the National Cervical Screening Program will change from 1 December 2017 to improve early detection and save more lives.

The Renewal of the National Cervical Screening Program will be implemented on 1 December 2017.  Until the renewed National Cervical Screening Program is implemented, our world-class cervical cancer screening program will continue.

From 1 December 2017, the two yearly Pap test for women aged 18 to 69 will change to a five-yearly human papillomavirus (HPV) test for women aged 25 to 74. Women will be due for the first Cervical Screening Test two years after their last Pap test.

The changes include:

• women will be invited when they are due to participate via the National Cancer Screening Register

• the Pap smear will be replaced with the more accurate Cervical Screening Test

• the time between tests will change from two to five years

• the age at which screening starts will increase from 18 years to 25 years

• women aged 70 to 74 years will be invited to have an exit test

Until the renewed National Cervical Screening Program is implemented, women aged between 18 and 69 years who have ever been sexually active should continue to have a Pap test when due.

  • You can find the new guidelines here 

Five myths about the new cervical screening program that refuse to die

The Conversation, March 10, 2017 6.23am AEDT

The online petition against changes to Australia’s cervical cancer screening program has revealed more than 70,000 people (most of whom we could assume are women) are deeply concerned about what the upcoming changes mean.

Let’s have a look at some common misconceptions and concerns about changes to the cervical cancer screening program.

Read more here 

HPV urine test could screen for cervical cancer

NHS Choices, Wednesday September 17 2014

Research found urine-based testing for HPV DNA showed signs it might be accurate enough to provide a viable screening method, given further research and development.

Read more

Doctors fear NSW women abandoning Pap smears

Sydney Morning Herald, September 23, 2014 – 12:15AM

The state’s leading cancer body is concerned that as many as 10 per cent of women are putting themselves at risk of developing cervical cancer by skipping their regular Pap smear.