Sexual health and its linkages to reproductive health: an operational approach

 World Health Organization, 2017

Sexual health and reproductive health are closely linked, but crucial aspects of sexual health can be overlooked when grouped under or together with the domain of reproductive health.

In order to create broader awareness of comprehensive sexual health interventions and to ensure that sexual health and reproductive health both receive full attention in programming (including provision of health services) and research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reviewed its working definition of sexual health to create a framework for an operational approach to sexual health.

The framework, which is intended to support policy-makers and programme implementers and to provide a stronger foundation for further research and learning in sexual health, is presented and described in full in this brief.

The Aboriginal Gender Study

Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, 2019

Partnering with the University of Adelaide and the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, the Aboriginal Gender Study aimed to explore, from a strengths-based perspective, the diversity of contemporary perspectives of gender, gender roles and gender equity in South Australian Aboriginal communities.

The project addressed three overall questions comprising:

1. What is the current evidence about gender roles and gender equity in the Australian
literature and Australian policy documents regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people?

2. What is the current understanding of gender roles and relationships in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities?

3. What might gender equity/fairness look like for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, adults, families and communities?

For findings and recommendations, please see report:

 

Video: teaching Arabs to talk about sex

BBC news, 09 Jul 2019

Safa Tamish teaches Palestinians to talk about sex, a topic often seen as taboo in the Arab world.

She encourages workshop participants to speak frankly, for example not shying away from using proper names for body parts in Arabic.

A survey for BBC Arabic across the Middle East and North Africa has looked at attitudes on issues ranging from religion to homosexuality and migration.

Of 25,000 people interviewed by Arab Barometer, 44% said they had the right to freedom of expression, down from 64% in 2013.

FRESH: Aboriginal Focus course on 27-28 June

SHINE SA, 29/05/2019

The FRESH Course: Aboriginal Focus is a 2-day course for workers who wish to improve their sexual and reproductive health knowledge and address sexual and reproductive health and relationship issues within Aboriginal communities.

On completion of the FRESH course, you will:

  • have an increased level of confidence working with Aboriginal communities in the area of sexual health
  • have a better understanding of cultural sensitivities and how to engage around sexual health
  • be able to identify the sexual health issues faced by Aboriginal people in South Australia
  • be introduced to new sexual health language and communication skills to improve client/worker relationships
  • develop skills to yarn with clients about their sexual health needs
  • be exposed to appropriate Aboriginal sexual health resources

WHEN: 27-28 June 2019
WHERE: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville
TIME: 9.00am – 5.00pm
COST: $250

Download flyer: FRESH Aboriginal Focus 2019

SA drug bill risks another Stolen Gen: Aboriginal Health Council

InDaily, March 21st, 2018

The head of South Australia’s peak Aboriginal health body has warned that a State Government plan to enforce mandatory drug treatment on young people risks dispossessing Aboriginal children of their culture.

Aboriginal Health Council state branch CEO Shane Mohor has joined a growing chorus of social service and health bodies that have criticised the Controlled Substance (Youth Treatment Orders) Amendment Bill currently before state parliament.

“No‐one’s driving this bus” – qualitative analysis of PrEP health promotion for Aboriginal gay and bisexual men

“No‐one’s driving this bus” – qualitative analysis of PrEP health promotion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay and bisexual men

Aust NZ J Public Health,  2019; 43:18-23; doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12852
Objective: HIV prevention tools such as pre‐exposure prophylaxis require equitable access and uptake to protect all at‐risk populations. This project assessed the perceived barriers to accessible HIV prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay and bisexual men (GBM) and evaluated the presence of health promotion for pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for this population from the perspective of service providers.

Methods: Eighteen semi‐structured interviews with healthcare providers, researchers and AIDS Council employees were qualitatively analysed for themes and concepts related to PrEP‐specific health promotion.

Results: Respondents noted AIDS Councils and affiliated sexual health clinics had been instrumental in promoting PrEP to at‐risk GBM. However, many Aboriginal gay and bisexual men who are not well connected with these communities and services may not have been exposed to this health promotion and therefore have not accessed PrEP effectively.

Conclusions: Aboriginal community and gay community controlled health organisations need to collaborate to ensure they deliver effective and tailored health promotion to Aboriginal communities.

Implications for public health: The rising HIV notification rates in Aboriginal Australians is an example of the health gap experienced by First Nation people. Effective HIV prevention is required to ensure this gap does not widen further, and that Australia meets its goal of preventing all new HIV infections. However, these efforts will be hampered by ineffective health promotion of HIV prevention tools, such as PrEP, for Aboriginal Australians.