Push to dispel myths about long-lasting contraception

Guardian Australia, Tuesday 26 September 2017 

Misplaced concerns and myths about long-acting reversible contraceptives have prompted medical experts to release Australia’s first consensus statement, saying they are more reliable and effective than condoms or the pill.

Despite their safety, efficacy and widespread use internationally, the uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is low in Australia. On Tuesday the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association released a consensus statement – endorsed by 18 agencies, including SHINE SA – on the use of LARCs.

Contraception for women living with violence

Children by Choice, Last modified on: 22 May 2017

Contraceptive use is often compromised for women living with violence. 

Contraceptive options that are safe and appropriate for one woman may not work for another. If you’re working with women experiencing violence, it’s important to explore each woman’s unique circumstances and draw on her own knowledge to assess the degree of comfort and safety with her contraceptive options.

Important factors to consider include whether the perpetrator is likely to:

  • Monitor the woman’s Medicare or prescription records through her MyGov account;
  • Restrict or monitor access to health care professionals;
  • Monitor menstruation and fertility patterns;
  • Engage in severe physical assaults;
  • Be actively searching for the use of contraceptive drugs or devices; and/or
  • Engage in rape and other forms of sexual assault.

This guide is not intended to replace a full medical consultation with a professional, but does provide a starting point for thinking further about which contraceptive options might be safest and most appropriate given an individual patient’s or client’s circumstances.

  • Read more here
  • Download full resource (PDF) here 

 

Mirena IUD effective for seven years: new study

Dr Jennifer Gunter, September 10 2016

The Mirena intrauterine system (IUS), the IUD with the hormone levonorgestrel, is a highly effective method of contraception currently approved for five years. Some data suggests that it probably good for six years, but a new study tells us with a good degree of confidence that the Mirena is safe and effective for seven years. 

The study was funded by UNDP/ UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research and published in the journal Contraception.