Women with disabilities: publications

Women with Disabilities ACT, updated 2019

On this page you can find all of Women with Disabilities ACT’s major submissions to government, research reports and policy statements. Accessible versions have been provided where possible.

Some relevant documents on the page include:

  • Contraception, Consent, Respectful Relationships & Sexuality, May 2019 [pdf] [docx]
  • WWDACT Submission to the Inquiry into Maternity Services in the ACT, January 2019 [pdf] [docx]
  • Contraception and Consent: A Comparative Analysis of the Legal Frameworks for Accessing Contraception, August 2017 [pdf] [docx]
  • WWDACT Submission on the Inquiry into the Crimes (Consent) Amendment Bill 2018, September 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Letter Supporting the Crimes (Consent) Amendment Bill 2018, March 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to the Justice and Community Safety Directorate: Sexual Assault Guidelines – Restorative Justice Referrals February 2018 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to Discussion Paper: Domestic and Family Violence – Policy Approaches and Responses, September 2017 [pdf]
  • WWDACT Submission to the ALRC—Family Violence Cth Laws 2011, October 2011 [pdf] [Rich Text]

Access webpage here 

Secondary students’ sexual health survey results

La Trobe University, 11th June 2019

The sixth National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health, conducted in 2018 and released today, found 47 per cent of Year 10-12 students taking the survey had engaged in sexual intercourse.  Of sexually active respondents, 76 per cent had sex at home; 65 per cent with a boyfriend or girlfriend; 62 percent often or always used a condom; and 86 per cent with somebody about the same age.

Lead researcher at La Trobe University’s Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society Dr Christopher Fisher said the survey asked 6327 Year 10-12 students in Government, Catholic and Independent schools from each state and territory, about their sexual behaviour and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections.

“Overall, young Australians have good knowledge of sexual health, are behaving responsibly and are actively seeking out trusted, reliable sources of information,” Dr Fisher said.

Updated fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs)

SHINE SA, May 2019

We have recently updated our fact sheet on Fertility Awareness Methods (FAMs). 

There has been a rise in popularity of  period tracking and fertility tracking apps, used for ‘calendar-based’ fertility awareness methods. FAMs are methods where people become aware of the signs of fertility and learn to detect when they are most likely to become pregnant.

These methods rely on the motivation, experience, commitment and cooperation of all sexual partners to be effective for contraception or conception.

The fact sheet answers question such as ‘how effective are such methods?’ and ‘what are the advantages and disadvantages?.

Reproductive coercion research – seeking GPs

The University of Melbourne, May 2019

Reproductive coercion (RC) is an under recognised form of abuse experienced by Australian women. RC refers to a group of behaviours that intend to control a woman with regards to reproduction. Contraceptive sabotage, pregnancy coercion and controlling the outcome of a pregnancy are all forms of RC and often occur alongside other forms of abuse in a relationship.

Researchers at the The University of Melbourne are undertaking a project exploring GP’s experiences responding to RC. They aim to understand how GPs identify and respond to this type of abuse. They ask that any antenatal care GPs, or GPs who prescribe medical termination of pregnancy medication to participate in a confidential interview with a member of their team. The interview can be conducted either by telephone or face to face, at a time convenient to your busy schedule. Interviews take approximately 20 minutes and all interview data will be de-identified.

Ethics ID: 1853440.

To register your interest in the project or to gain more information about the project please contact: Molly Wellington

Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods chart – new edition 2019

Family Planning Alliance Australia, 2019

How effective is each contraceptive method? This revised chart compares methods of contraception for their efficacy. 

The figures have been derived by expert consensus using results from a variety of studies, selecting figures from studies which appear to be most comparable to Australian conditions.

National abortion data vital to safe, accessible services

MJA InSight+, Issue 10 / 18 March 2019

EXPERTS are in the dark about the extent to which abortion is contributing to Australia’s historically low teenage birth rate, prompting renewed calls for the collection of national abortion data.

In a Perspective published by the MJA, Professor Susan Sawyer, Chair of Adolescent Health at the University of Melbourne, and Dr Jennifer Marino, research fellow at the University of Melbourne, have called for the collection of abortion data in all states and territories, with national integration and analysis. They further called for publicly funded abortion clinics in all states and territories, with a feasible plan for access for people living in remote areas.