RACGP offers new suite of IUD resources

RACGP, 25th August 2020

The newly released suite consists of five intrauterine device (IUD) resources, including a checklist and patient confirmation form, patient pre- and post-insertion checklist, practitioner checklist and disclaimer. Current evidence-based options for pain relief during IUD procedures are provided as an appendix.

Dr Amy Moten, Chair of the RACGP Specific Interests Sexual Health Medicine network, led development of the resources, which she says are designed to provide guidance and support to all Australian practitioners.

Free workshop series on Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

South Australian Council on Intellectual Disability, July 2020

Sexuality and Relationships is an essential area of learning for people with an intellectual disability. Adults with intellectual disability say they want to learn together in their own right. Parents and carers can make a big difference in small ways by improving their own knowledge and using supportive approaches.

These interactive workshops will be presented in both the northern and southern suburbs of Adelaide. All workshops are free of charge.

Handouts and resources will be provided during the workshops.

Workshops for parents of people with intellectual disability: Each region will have a set of four 1-day education workshops for parents. The introductory workshop Sexuality and Disability is offered three times. It is recommended that you try to attend one of these sessions before attending others. You can enrol in one or more of the workshops. The Puberty and Adolescence Workshop will be held at the Special Education Resource Unit of the Department of Education in Henley Beach (SERU). This is so that parents of school-age children can become familiar with the range of resources available to them and their children for use at home and at school.
Other sessions will be held in a variety of venues. Parents will have first priority and support workers may also attend if numbers allow.

There will also be a series of four workshops for adults with intellectual disability.

Please see flyer for more information.

Tickets to the LGBTI Family Violence Forum available now (free online events)

Thorne Harbour Health, 22nd July 2020

Effecting Change and Accountability: Family Violence Interventions for LGBTI Communities: Monday 10th to Friday 14th August 2020

Since the release of Victoria’s Royal Commission into Family Violence recommendations in 2016, LGBTI family violence service providers and mainstream family violence services who are attaining rainbow tick accreditation have worked more deliberately to develop and sustain inclusive and informed responses to LGBTI people using or experiencing family violence.

This annual community-led forum offers a platform to LGBTI community organisations and allied organisations to present their work, share knowledge, skills and look at service areas that need further development. This forum will provide information, presentations, interactive workshops and networking opportunities for service providers and other professionals about family violence in LGBTI communities.

We invite practitioners and community advocates from family violence sector and LGBTI community sectors, allied health sector practitioners, policy writers, victim survivor advocates, community organisers and people who are committed to the work to end family violence and break down LGBTI stigma and discrimination, increase community connectedness, improve community awareness of the needs of LGBTI communities, as well as striving to remove barriers to LGBTI inclusion, celebration, and embracing diversity.

Tickets available now: 

Call for study participants: Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and its impact on LGBTQ individuals

University of Birmingham, May 2020

Image Based Sexual Abuse (IBSA) and the impact this has on the well-being of LGBTQ individuals

Image Based Sexual Abuse

This PhD study aims to explore LGBTQ individuals’ experiences of Image Based Sexual Abuse (also known as revenge pornography) on their mental health and well-being. The study is also interested in how much health and well-being organisations understand about IBSA and how easy it is for individuals to access services.

Victims of IBSA express symptoms of depression, anxiety and in some instances suicidal tendencies. This harmful impact can be felt in both the private and professional spheres for the victims. Internet users who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning or queer (LGBTQ) are far more likely than those who identify as heterosexual to have experienced threats of or actual non-consensual image-sharing. However, the majority of the current body of research focuses on heterosexual women and there is little research that is aimed at the long-term implications this can have on LGBTQ individuals in regards to their mental health and well-being. All members of the team work in the School of Nursing/ School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham. Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones is the Principal PhD Supervisor for this study and is the Programme Lead for the Risk Abuse and Violence Research Programme within the School of Nursing. Dr Nicki Ward is a lecturer in social work and is a PhD Supervisor of this study. Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers is a senior lecturer within the school of nursing and is exploring this topic as part of his PhD studies.

If you are LGBTQ and have experienced IBSA we think that you could offer a great deal in helping us with the study.

Key researchers:

  • Dr Caroline Bradbury-Jones

  • Dr Nicki Ward

  • Mr Ronnie Meechan-Rogers

Read more or contact researchers here

 

Factsheet: Your rights and responsibilities when living with hepatitis B or hepatitis C

Hepatitis Australia,  23 April 2020

This brief factsheet provides an overview of peoples’ rights and responsibilities when living with hepatitis B or hepatitis C.

Let’s Celebrate Safer Sex this National Condom Day (SHINE SA Media Release)

SHINE SA, 11 February 2020

Forget Valentine’s Day, there’s a new romantic day occupying February 14: National Condom Day! With only 36% of young South Australians always using a condom during casual sex, it’s no surprise that STI rates are on the rise. Like an elusive Valentine’s partner, many STIs are hidden. Around 70% of people with chlamydia have no symptoms, going unnoticed while being transmitted to others.

So what could be more romantic than preventing the unintended consequences of unprotected sex? Show some romance by taking advantage of how easy it is to get your hands on a condom. Condoms are widely available, don’t require a prescription and can even be found for free at SHINE SA clinics. SHINE SA encourages all young people to take steps to engage in safer sex. This means always having a condom handy, making time for that discussion with your partner/s, ensuring you have informed and enthusiastic consent and getting regular sexual health checks either through a GP or at a SHINE SA clinic.

Natasha Miliotis SHINE SA’s Chief Executive said:

“National Condom Day is a great reminder to take control of our own sexual health. Through the use of condoms and regular testing, STIs are preventable.”

For more information on the sexual health of young people in South Australia see: www.sahmri.org/aboriginal-health-equity-theme/news-270/

Want to learn more about safer sex? To mark National Condom Day SHINE SA have released the Safer Sex – Use a Condom campaign. The campaign highlights the importance of condoms and the concepts of safety, pleasure and respect for a safer sex life. View the campaign here: www.shinesa.org.au/safersex

For further information and media enquiries see media release for contacts: