Lastest Gay Community Periodic Survey for Adelaide released

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, June 2019

Gay Community Periodic Survey: Adelaide 2018

Authors: Broady, T., Mao, L., Bavinton, B., Jeffries, D., Bartlett, S., Calabretto, H., Narciso, L., Prestage, G., & Holt.

The Adelaide Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited at a range of gay community sites in Adelaide, and online throughout South Australia. The major aim of the survey is to provide data on sexual, drug use, and testing practices related to the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) among gay men. The most recent survey, the twelfth in South Australia, was conducted in November and December 2018 to coincide with the Adelaide Feast Festival.

Key points

– The proportion of men who reported ever having been tested for HIV increased from 83% in 2011 to 87% in 2018.

– The percentage of non-HIV-positive men who reported testing for HIV in the 12 months prior to the survey remained stable (and was reported by 71% in 2018), although the percentage reporting three or more HIV tests in the previous year increased (from 11% in 2014 to 22% in 2018).

– The use of HIV treatment by HIV-positive men has remained stable over time (and was reported by 93% of HIV-positive men in 2018). The percentage of men on antiretroviral treatment who reported an undetectable viral load also remained stable (reported by 94% in 2018).

Mobile phone apps remained the most common way that men met male sex partners, reported by 44% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with regular male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIR) increased from 55% in 2011 to 65% in 2018.

– The proportion of men with casual male partners reporting condomless anal intercourse with those partners (CAIC) increased from 38% in 2011 to 51% in 2018.

– Most of the recent increase in CAIC appears to be attributable to the growing proportion of HIV-negative men using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

STI testing among HIV-negative men has remained stable over time, with 74% reporting any STI test in the year prior to the 2018 survey. The proportion of HIV-positive men reporting any STI test in the previous year decreased from 91% in 2011 to 72% in 2018.

Use of PrEP increased between 2014 and 2018 from 1% to 16% of non-HIV-positive men.

Giving gay men self-test kits increases HIV testing by 50% – but STI tests decrease

aidsmap/nam, 21 August 2018

Gay men who were offered HIV home-testing kits took 50% more tests than men who only took HIV tests at clinics or community organisations, a randomised controlled study from Seattle in the USA has found.

The men who could self-test took fewer tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), though it is not completely clear whether this was because they went less often for STI checkups or had fewer STI symptoms.

 

Community-level changes in condom use and uptake of HIV PrEP by gay and bisexual men in Melbourne and Sydney

Lancet HIV (2018). Published online 06 June 2018. doi: 10.1016/S2352-301830072-9.

Abstract:

Background

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been rapidly rolled out in large, publicly funded implementation projects in Victoria and New South Wales, Australia. Using behavioural surveillance of gay and bisexual men, we analysed the uptake and effect of PrEP, particularly on condom use by gay and bisexual men not using PrEP.

Methods

We collected data from the Melbourne and Sydney Gay Community Periodic Surveys (GCPS), cross-sectional surveys of adult gay and bisexual men in Melbourne, VIC, and Sydney, NSW. Recruitment occurred at gay venues or events and online. Eligible participants were 18 years or older (face-to-face recruitment) or 16 years or older (online recruitment), identified as male (including transgender participants who identified as male); and having had sex with a man in the past 5 years or identified as gay or bisexual, or both. Using multivariate logistic regression, we assessed trends in condom use, condomless anal intercourse with casual partners (CAIC), and PrEP use by gay and bisexual men, controlling for sample variation over time.

Findings

Between Jan 1, 2013, and March 31, 2017, 27 011 participants completed questionnaires in the Melbourne (n=13 051) and Sydney (n=13 960) GCPS. 16 827 reported sex with casual male partners in the 6 months before survey and were included in these analyses. In 2013, 26 (1%) of 2692 men reported CAIC and were HIV-negative and using PrEP, compared with 167 (5%) of 3660 men in 2016 and 652 (16%) of 4018 men in 2017 (p<0·0001). Consistent condom use was reported by 1360 (46%) of 2692 men in 2013, 1523 (42%) of 3660 men in 2016, and 1229 (31%) of 4018 men in 2017 (p<0·0001). In 2013, 800 (30%) of 2692 men who were HIV-negative or untested and not on PrEP reported CAIC, compared with 1118 (31%) of 3660 men in 2016, and 1166 (29%) of 4018 in 2017 (non-significant trend).

Interpretation

A rapid increase in PrEP use by gay and bisexual men in Melbourne and Sydney was accompanied by an equally rapid decrease in consistent condom use. Other jurisdictions should consider the potential for community-level increases in CAIC when modelling the introduction of PrEP and in monitoring its effect.