Pelvic mesh implant patients want answers from Senate report

ABC 730 report, 26/3/2018

A steady stream of Australian women with pelvic mesh implants have spent tens of thousands of dollars flying to a clinic in Missouri to have their implants removed, claiming they have suffered major side-effects from the implants used to treat prolapse and incontinence.

More than 35 Australian women have made the journey to the same practitioner because, they say, they don’t have faith in Australian surgeons to carry out a full removal of their implant.

The claim that Australia does not have the expertise is rejected by both the Australian Medical Association (AMA) and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG).

 

 

Gonorrhoea and syphilis on the rise among among heterosexual men and women in Melbourne

ABC News, 16th January 2018

Melbourne is facing a rapid increase in cases of the sexually transmitted diseases syphilis and gonorrhoea.

Data from the Melbourne Sexual Health Clinic shows the number of gonorrhoea infections has increased 30 per cent annually since 2015.

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to the call to ban Diane-35

SHINE SA, issued 13th December 2017

SHINE SA believes everyone should have access to contraceptive choices, and that decisions about contraception are best made in conjunction with a healthcare professional.

Cyproterone acetate pills, commonly known as Diane-35 appear to be associated with a higher risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) than levonorgestrel (LNG) containing pills, although the overall risk is still very low for most people.

For those who choose combined pills, we recommend as first choice the pills with lowest risk: those containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone as their progesterone. However, the other progestogen choices, which all carry a small increased risk of DVT compared to LNG, may be utilised if specific added benefits are required. Health professionals can review over time the experience individuals may have with their contraceptive choice.

Cyproterone acetate can be used as treatment for signs of androgenisation in people such as severe acne (involving inflammation or nodularity, or risk of scarring) where prolonged oral antibiotics or local treatment alone have not been successful, or idiopathic hirsutism of mild to moderate degree. The oral contraceptive pill containing cyproterone acetate can also provide effective oral contraception in this patient group.
People who have concerns should seek advice from their doctor before stopping their oral contraceptive pill.

Download Media release (PDF): Response to the call to ban Diane-35 SHINE SA Diane35_13 Dec 17_FS

 

SHINE SA Media Release: Response to ABC report on Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

SHINE SA, Issued: 13 December 2017

SHINE SA believes that decisions about contraception should be made in conjunction with a health care professional and that everyone should have access to accurate and unbiased information to enable appropriate informed contraceptive choice.

LARCs (Long Acting Reversible Contraception) including the levonorgestrel IUD1 (Mirena) and the subdermal implant (Implanon NXT) are the most effective reversible methods of contraception available. They have the additional advantage of being long lasting, convenient to use and generally well regarded by most users. LARC method failure rates rival that of tubal sterilization at <1% and unintended pregnancy rates are lower than those reported for contraceptive pill users.

Like all progestogen only contraceptive methods, LARCs may result in a change of bleeding pattern which may include no bleeding, frequent or prolonged bleeding. Users of the levonorgestrel IUD most commonly experience a reduction in bleeding over time and it is used as a treatment for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding for this reason. Only 1 in 5 users of the contraceptive implant have an increase in bleeding that persists beyond the first few months.

LARC use, and in particular the subdermal implant, is not known to be associated with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is an infection of the upper part of the female reproductive system namely the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. PID is a known side effect of IUD insertion but occurs in less than 1 in 300 people. The risk of PID is only increased for the first 3 weeks after insertion, after which it returns to the previous background risk. Users of IUDs are encourage to return at any sign of infection and when treated promptly with antibiotics are unlikely to experience any long term complications.

Later-term abortions: Stigma versus reality

Sydney Morning Herald,  

“We consider ourselves to be potential targets for domestic terrorism.”

That’s the reason one abortion provider gave for not wishing to be named when asked for comment about the situation facing later-term abortion providers in Australia.

Despite the backlash from some sectors of the community, Dr Jane Baird says her job is very satisfying.Dr Jane Baird

NASTAD Releases Statement of HIV Risk When Undetectable

Poz, USA, March 2017

The National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) released its own statement regarding the risk of sexual transmission of HIV from people who are virally suppressed.

The statement affirms that “durably virally suppressed people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy do not sexually transmit the virus.” It describes virally suppressed as “having a consistent viral load of less than < 200 copies/ml.”