Second HOW2 course announced for 2019

SHINE SA, July 2019

Our first course filled up, and as a result we are pleased to announce a second HOW2 course for this year! The HOW2 CREATE LGBTI INCLUSIVE SERVICES training program is an in-depth, practical program which helps organisations reach their inclusivity goals and potentially achieve accreditation as an inclusive service.

Delivered over 4 separate days, interspersed with time to implement practical improvements to your workplace’s inclusivity, this program will provide immediate benefits to your organisation.

The program is based on a set of 6 national standards developed by Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV), in conjunction with QIP (Quality, Innovation & Performance), known as Rainbow Tick Accreditation. SHINE SA was the first South Australian organisation to be awarded Rainbow Tick accreditation for LGBTI inclusive practice and is proud to support other organisations to create safer and more inclusive workplaces and services.

**If you are a not-for-profit or community youth-focused service you may qualify for the Department of Human Services Training subsidy.

DATES (Participants are required to attend all 4 sessions):

First session: Friday 4 October 2019
Second session: Friday 8 November 2019
Third session: Friday 13 December 2019
Final session: Friday 31 January 2020

TIME: 9:30am – 2:30pm

WHERE: SHINE SA @ Woodville

 

 

 

 

 

A community perspective: On Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancer among women and, trans and gender diverse people

Positive Life NSW & Femfatales, April 2019

Authors: Liz Sutherland, Lance Feeney, Katya Samodurov

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus which can be passed through skin to skin contact during sexual activity. Evidence to date shows that women living with HIV are 3 to 6 times more likely to develop cervical cancer than the general female population. They are also at greater risk of developing anal, vaginal, oropharyngeal and vulvar cancers.

There are other groups who may have a higher but preventable risk because they are often left out of the conversation about HPV and related cancers. Trans men are less likely to be up-todate with Pap tests to screen for cervical cancer. Furthermore, several studies have highlighted that trans and gender diverse people, and lesbian and bisexual cis-gendered women are often disregarded as not being at risk.

Positive Life and Femfatales developed a cross-sectional study to:

• Assess awareness and knowledge of HPV infection and risk for 4 HPV-related cancers (cervical, vaginal, vulvar, and anal) among women and, trans and gender diverse people in Australia;

• Assess the knowledge gaps to inform the development and implementation of population-specific educational resources to increase community and healthcare professional awareness of HPV and related cancers;

• Assist with the prevention of morbidity and mortality by increasing screening, early detection and treatment of HPV-related cancers, and;

• Assess rates of HPV vaccination in women and, trans and gender diverse people

KEY FINDINGS:

1. The results from this survey highlighted a lack of awareness of risk, prevention,
symptoms, and early detection of HPV-related vaginal, vulvar, and anal cancers.

2. Approximately 28% of HIV-positive respondents were unaware that a vaccination
against HPV exists and 71% of HIV-positive respondents had not been vaccinated
against HPV.

3. Over half (60%) of HIV-positive respondents believe their risk of anal cancer was either‘about the same’, ‘lower’, or ‘much lower’ than the general female population’s risk.

4. While all HIV-positive respondents had screened for cervical cancer at some point in
their lives, 91.7% had never had an anal examination for anal cancer.

5. Among HIV-positive and HIV-negative but immunocompromised respondents who had undergone staging or treatment for either cervical, vaginal, or vulvar cancer, none had ever screened for anal cancer.

6. Of the HIV-positive respondents who do not receive screening reminder notifications, none were aware of the new 3 yearly National Cervical Screening Guidelines and changes.

7. Qualitative responses indicated that respondents generally preferred having clinician-initiated conversations with female doctors or nurses who were non-judgemental, non-dismissive, clear, and made them feel comfortable.

8. In an open-ended short-answer question, more than 25% of qualitative respondents felt that more awareness and normalising talking about HPV in the public realm would help increase their chance of detecting HPV-related cancer early.

HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

2019 Community Survey Results from The South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA)

SARAA, 1 April 2019

The South Australian Rainbow Advocacy Alliance (SARAA) has analysed the results of their community survey and compiled them into a summary.

Some key findings:

  • Only 60% of respondents felt comfortable disclosing their gender and/or their
    sexual orientation when accessing services.
  • When accessing services, 37.7% of respondents felt that they didn’t receive
    sufficient and meaningful information to inform decision making.
  • 64% felt that the current level of LGBTIQ+ specific services did not
    adequately meet their needs.
  • This includes a lack of services and supports to rural and remote
    communities, a lack of services and supports for older LGBTIQ+ people
    and cuts to vital services for LGBTIQ+ people.
  • More support for trans people to access necessary medical services.

 

SA drug bill risks another Stolen Gen: Aboriginal Health Council

InDaily, March 21st, 2018

The head of South Australia’s peak Aboriginal health body has warned that a State Government plan to enforce mandatory drug treatment on young people risks dispossessing Aboriginal children of their culture.

Aboriginal Health Council state branch CEO Shane Mohor has joined a growing chorus of social service and health bodies that have criticised the Controlled Substance (Youth Treatment Orders) Amendment Bill currently before state parliament.

The Ban on ‘Amyl’

Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) recently postponed its decision on whether or not to change the law around alkyl nitrites (the active ingredient in ‘amyl’ or ‘poppers’). Currently, the TGA is conducting public consultations into the proposed amendments that could see amyl recategorised as a ‘prohibited substance’.

The legal consequence of this decision could see amyl fall into the same category as prohibited drugs like heroin, methamphetamine and cocaine, with serious penalties for their possession, use or supply. This issue has raised concerns within our communities where amyl is used during sex.

Submissions to the TGA

The deadline for written submissions to the TGA closed on 15 January 2019; however, a number of organisations expressed their concerns including:

Earlier this month, the Nitrites Action Group (comprised of community health advocates, researchers, and clinicians) released guidelines around community submissions to the TGA.