Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

Identifying and Plugging the Leaks: Gaps And Policy Barriers To Engagement With The HIV Cascade Of Care

CTAC (Canadian Treatment Action Council), 2018

This project explored what issues impact engagement by people living with HIV with healthcare in Ontario. The goal was to identify policy issues that impact treatment access for people living with HIV, and to identify opportunities to make the healthcare system more accessible.

The HIV Cascade of Care is a useful description of the different steps that a person living with HIV will need to take in order to achieve an undetectable viral load and optimal health outcomes, from infection and diagnosis through to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) initiation and viral suppression.

We know people drop out of the HIV Cascade of Care – e.g. why those starting treatment don’t stay on it. By seeking out policy barriers and developing solutions we can enable people to live long, healthy, and happy lives.

The project has five recommendations around barriers to engagement in the HIV Cascade of Care.

Download report here

 

Nutrition Therapy Guidelines will Help People Living with HIV Stay Healthy

UAB Medicine News, 23.04.18

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics released their new guidelines for medical nutrition therapy in HIV care titled “Practice Paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Nutrition Intervention and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection,” with Amanda Willig, Ph.D., R.D., assistant professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Division of Infectious Diseases, serving as the guideline’s lead author.

The guidelines are intended to help registered dietitians and dietetic technicians outline specific nutrition therapies that will benefit people living with HIV, as adequate nutrition often poses significant issues for this subset of patients. Side effects from the virus expose these patients to a higher risk of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, thus requiring nutritional guidance to be specifically tailored to their needs.

Hepatitis C cure leads to improved quality of life

hivandhepatitis.com, 23 October 2017

 People who were cured of hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) had sustained improvements in their health-related quality of life, including both physical and mental health measures, according to study results presented at the 2017 AASLD Liver Meeting this week in Washington, DC.

HIV-positive gay & bi men have increased risk of hospitalisation with anxiety & mood disorders

HIV-positive gay and bisexual men have increased risk of hospitalisation with anxiety and mood disorders, a risk factor for later mortality

aidsmap/nam, 07 September 2016

HIV-positive gay and bisexual men are almost ten times more likely to be hospitalised because of mood and anxiety disorders than men in the general population, according to Australian research published in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

Read more here

HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Forum – free event

Are you a doctor? Nurse? Medical student? Health practitioner? Community worker? Or just interested in Sexual health?

Come to SAMESH’s HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Forum!

Speakers:

  • Dr Russell Waddell
  • Dr Carole Khaw
  • Dr James Ward
  • Dr Nicola Chynoweth

Free event: networking, drinks and nibbles

On Thursday 6 October from 3.00 – 5.00 pm

At SHine SA, 57 Hyde Street, Adelaide

Presented by SAMESH

R S V P  by 30th September

Register at http://www.samesh.org.au/ forum

Or call (08) 7099 5300

Download flyer here: SAMESH-coinfection-forum-flyer-copy

On World Hepatitis Day it’s time to talk about HIV and hepatitis C

National Association of people with HIV Australia, July 28 2016

On World Hepatitis Day, the National Association of People with HIV Australia (NAPWHA), the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations (AFAO), the Kirby Institute and Hepatitis Australia are raising awareness about HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection.

An estimated 3,000 Australians are living both with HIV and HCV. HCV is more prevalent among people with HIV than in the broader population and is a major risk for health complications in people with HIV. HIV worsens hepatitis C-related liver disease, fastens the progression to cirrhosis, and leads to higher rates of death from both liver failure and liver cancer.

  • Read more by downloading document (MS Word) here: WHDMRFINAL
  • Access NAPHWA’s website here
  • Access Hepatitis SA’s website here