Providing safe and remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19

Rainbow Health Victoria, April 2020

We would like to acknowledge the difficult time we all face with the current public health crisis caused by coronavirus (COVID-19). Overall, older people and those with underlying health conditions are more at risk. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) communities are known to have significant health disparities, which might influence disease outcomes. These include a greater risk for HIV, certain cancers, asthma, obesity and cardiovascular disease, and higher smoking rates.

Accessing available health and community support services is more important than ever for LGBTIQ communities. But barriers to accessing services – for example, expecting or experiencing discrimination – may be heightened at times of stress and upheaval. Rainbow Health Victoria has created this tip sheet to assist in providing safe and inclusive remote services to LGBTIQ people due to the impact of COVID-19.

Client violence towards workers in the child, family and community welfare sector

Australian Institute of Family Studies. CFCA Paper No. 54 – March 2020

This paper explores the prevalence and presentation of client violence towards workers, considering any violent or aggressive behaviour from clients, direct associates of clients, and friends or family members of clients. It compares current research on client violence towards workers to official data reports, and considers why there might be a discrepancy between the two sets of data. It details the effects that client violence has on workers personally and the implications for their practice. Finally, it outlines strategies for improving responses to client violence towards workers, including practical responses that can be implemented at an organisational, educational and policy level.

A comparative, retrospective analysis of HIV testing among gay, bisexual and other MSM in Melbourne

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
First published: 29 May 2019
https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12903

Abstract

Objective: PRONTO!, a peer‐led rapid HIV‐testing service in Melbourne, Australia, opened to improve HIV testing among gay and bisexual men (GBM). We compared client characteristics and return testing among GBM testing at PRONTO! with GBM testing at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC).

Methods: All GBM attending PRONTO! and MSHC for HIV testing between August 2013 and April 2016 were included. We describe the number of tests, percentage of clients who returned during follow‐up, the mean number of tests and median time between tests at the two services.

Results: At PRONTO!, 33% of 3,102 GBM and at MSHC 50% of 9,836 GBM returned for a further HIV test at least once. The mean number of tests per client was 1.7 and 2.5 at PRONTO! and MSHC (p<0.01), respectively. A majority of clients at both services reported behaviours that would recommend up to quarterly testing, however, the median time between tests was 20.0 and 17.0 weeks at PRONTO! and MSHC (p<0.01), respectively.

Conclusions: A greater proportion of clients returned and returned frequently at MSHC compared to PRONTO!, however, at both services HIV testing frequency was suboptimal.

Implications for public health: Novel HIV testing services should provide convenient and comprehensive sexual health services.

‘Sussing that doctor out’: Experiences of people affected by hepatitis C regarding private GPs in SA

‘Sussing that doctor out.’ Experiences and perspectives of people affected by hepatitis C regarding engagement with private general practitioners in South Australia: a qualitative study

BMC Fam Pract. 2017 Nov 29;18(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12875-017-0669-2.

Abstract

Background: Australians with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can access affordable Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatments with high cure rates (>90%), via General Practitioners (GPs). Benefits from this treatment will be maximised if people with HCV readily disclose and engage with private GPs regarding HCV-related issues. Investigating the perceptions and experiences of people affected by HCV with GPs can allow for this pathway to care for HCV to be improved.

Methods: In 2013–2014, 22 purposively sampled participants from South Australia (SA) were interviewed. They a) had contracted or were at risk of hepatitis C (n = 10), b) were key workers who had clients affected by HCV (n = 6), and c) met both a) and b) criteria (n = 6). The semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.

Results: People affected by HCV viewed GPs as a source of general healthcare but, due to negative experiences and perceptions, many developed a strategy of “sussing” out doctors before engaging with and disclosing to a GP regarding HCV-related issues. Participants were doubtful about the benefits of engagement and disclosure, and did not assume that they would be provided best-practice care in a non-discriminatory, non-judgemental way. They perceived risks to confidentiality and risks of changes to the care they received from GPs upon disclosure.

Conclusion: GPs may need to act in ways that counteract the perceived risks and persuade people affected by HCV of the benefits of seeking HCV-related care.

Recognise and Respond to Disclosures of Rape and Sexual Assault -1 Day Training

Women’s and Children’s Health Network, June 2018

This training is designed for workers in all areas of human services and health
care. The focus will be on providing knowledge, skills and attributes necessary to
provide appropriate trauma informed response to adults who have been raped
or sexually assaulted.

This involves an understanding of the context in which rape and sexual assault occurs; the ability to assess client needs and match them to services available; and supporting the rights of clients through the implementation of practices which promote client self-determination.

Prerequisites:  None
When: 9:30am – 4:30pm TUESDAY 4th SEPTEMBER, 2018
Where: Yarrow Place, Level 2, 55 King William Road, North Adelaide
Cost: $150.00 + GST per day (WCHN Staff discount $50 + GST per day). Invoice will be sent to the person responsible for the payment

Morning tea and lunch provided

RSVP: Please email marianne.law@sa.gov.au to register. Seating is strictly limited.

Parking: Yarrow Place has no on-site parking available, there is parking at the Women’s & Children’s Hospital or Wilson’s car park on Kermode Street otherwise there is 2 hour street parking around the North Adelaide area.

This training is presented by Yarrow Place staff

Download flyer: 18.9.4 R R YP Training 4th Sept

Still places left in Foundations of LGBTI Inclusion half-day training

SHINE SA, 25/01/2018

Creating and sustaining a workplace that values and celebrates sexual and gender diversity has far reaching benefits for all of the stakeholders in your organisation. By providing a culture of safety and respect for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) employees, clients or other stakeholders, your organisation as a whole will benefit from a culture that values and upholds diversity of all kinds. Our Foundations of LGBTI Inclusion training is a half-day (4 hour) workshop that gives participants an overview of the knowledge needed to create an inclusive workplace.

It is low cost ($75 inc GST), and covers topics such as gender diversity, inclusive language and anti-discrimination laws. We will look at key areas of focus for increasing awareness and cultural sensitivity, creating a safe and inclusive environment and where to access further resources and support.

SHine SA was the first  outh Australian organisation to be awarded
Rainbow Tick Accreditation for LGBTI Inclusive practice. We are also respected
for our education and training, making us ideally placed to train your staff on
LGBTI Cultural Safety and Respect.