Forum: Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Hepatitis SA, January 2018

Hepatitis SA invites you to The 2018 HepLINK Forum:
Engaging Marginalised Populations in Hepatitis C Treatment

Thjis will be held on Thursday, 1 March, 11am–2pm (lunch provided), at the Education Development Centre (EDC), 4 Milner St, Hindmarsh.

  • Keynote speaker:
    Dr Phillip Read, Director, Kirketon Road Centre
    Dr Phillip Read is a sexual health physician and the Director of the Kirketon Road Centre in Sydney’s Kings Cross. Kirketon Road is a primary health care facility involved in the prevention, treatment and care of HIV, hepatitis and STIs among people who inject drugs, sex workers and at-risk young people.
    PLUS
  •  Rosalie Altus, Practice Consultant Viral Hepatitis Liaison Nurse, Flinders Medical Centre
  • Panel discussion with guest speakers representing the Aboriginal, youth, regional, multicultural and CNP sectors across South Australia

Please RSVP to admin@hepatitissa.asn.au by Friday 23 February, 2018.

For further information about the event, please phone Tess on 8362 8443.

Changes to CNP services in SA

SA Health, October 2017

From 1 January 2018, Mission Australia Hindmarsh Centre after-hours Clean Needle Program (CNP) service component (Monday to Friday 5pm to 8pm) will discontinue. However, the daytime CNP service at the Hindmarsh Centre, provided by Hepatitis SA staff will continue Monday to Friday 1.30pm to 5.00pm, with syringe vending machine services available 24 hours per day 7 days per week until 30 June 2018.

The following expanded after-hours CNP service options will become available to clients in the Adelaide metropolitan area in October and November 2017:

  1. NEW  Uniting Communities Hendon CNP service details – opening Monday 9th October 2017:
  • 45-47 Tapleys Hill Rd, Hendon (ph) 8202 5610
  • After-hours CNP service Monday to Sunday 5.00pm to 12.00am (midnight).
  • Daytime CNP service Monday to Sunday 9.00am to 5.00pm.
  • 1 x syringe vending machine available 24 hrs per day 7 days per week from mid-October onwards
  1. NEW Thursday night DASSA Central Stepney after-hours CNP service details – opening Thursday 16th November 2017:
  • 91 Magill Rd, Stepney (ph) 7245 5080
  • After hours CNP service Thursdays only 5.00pm to 9.00pm
  • Daytime CNP service Monday to Friday 9.00am to 5.00pm
  • 2 x syringe vending machines available 24hrs per day 7 days per week.

Syringe vending machines continue to be available 24hr per day 7 days per week at the following locations in SA:

  • NORTH – DASSA Northern Service, 22 Langford Drive, ELIZABETH.
  • SOUTH – Noarlunga Health Village, Alexander Kelly Drive, NOARLUNGA
  • EAST – DASSA Central Service, 91 Magill Rd, STEPNEY
  • WEST – Hindmarsh Centre, 35 Richards St, HINDMARSH.

Free community CNP sites across South Australia:

  • For a complete list of all free community CNP sites across South Australia, type “Clean Needle Program SA” into the Google search bar and then click on the link for “Clean Needle Program Sites List – SA Health”.
  • OR  call  the Alcohol and Drug Information Service (ADIS) on 1300 131 340

For further information:

Please contact the Clean Needle Program by phoning (08) 7425 5080

 

 

People who use drugs require prioritisation not exclusion in efforts to eliminate Hepatitis C

6th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users,  6th Sept 2017

An international conference bringing together hepatitis C experts from around the world is today calling for strategies to prioritise people who use drugs, saying hepatitis C elimination is impossible without them.

“The number of people around the world dying from hepatitis C is increasing. We have the tools to reverse this trend, to eliminate this disease and save millions of lives. But it will not happen until people who use drugs become a focus of our efforts,” said Associate Professor Jason Grebely, President of the International Network of Hepatitis C in Substance Users (INHSU), the convenors of the conference.

 

Australia leads the world in hepatitis C treatment – what’s behind its success?

The Conversation, July 31, 2017 4.05pm AEST

The World Health Organisation recently set ambitious goals for the “elimination of hepatitis C as a major public health threat”. These included having 80% of people treated and an 80% reduction in the spread of the virus by 2030. Given there are around 70 million people infected with hep C worldwide, only 20% diagnosed, and no effective vaccine, the task ahead is enormous.

But Australia is impressively heading towards these targets and may present a model for other countries to adopt. A recent report by the Kirby Institute estimated Australia was on track to eliminate hepatitis C by 2026 – four years earlier than the WHO goal.

Australian Needle and Syringe Program Survey: National Data Report 2012 – 2016

The Kirby Institute, UNSW, May 2017

The Australian Needle and Syringe Program Survey (ANSPS) provides serial point prevalence estimates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies and sexual and injecting risk behaviour among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Australia.
Conducted annually over a one-two week period in October, all clients attending participating needle and syringe program (NSP) services are invited to complete a brief, anonymous questionnaire and to provide a capillary blood sample for HIV and HCV antibody testing.
This report presents national and state/territory data for the period 2012 to 2016.

Key findings:

  • In 2016, 50 Australian Needle and Syringe Programs (NSPs) participated in the ANSPS and 2,210 NSP attendees completed the survey. The response rate was 41%.
  • Over the period 2012 to 2016, the median age of survey respondents increased from 38 years to 42 years, with a concurrent decrease in the proportion of young injectors (aged <25 years) from 7% in 2012 to 4% in 2016.
  • HIV antibody prevalence remained low and stable nationally, ranging from 1.2% to 2.1% over the period 2012 to 2016
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody prevalence was stable over the period 2012 to 2016, ranging from 51% to 57%.
  • Nationally, the proportion of respondents who reported recent (last 12 months) initiation of HCV treatment was low and stable at 1-3% between 2011-2015, but increased significantly to 22% in 2016, with substantial increases observed in all jurisdictions.

Download Australian Needle and Syringe Program Survey: National Data Report 2012 – 2016 (PDF) 

Study suggests drug criminalization undermining global HIV/AIDS efforts

Medical News Today, May 2017

The criminalization of drugs is a leading factor in the world’s HIV epidemic and a potential barrier to eradicating HIV/AIDS, say researchers who’ve undertaken a sweeping review of research on laws and policies prohibiting drug use. Assistant professor Kora DeBeck of SFU’s School of Public Policy, who is a research scientist with the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, is co-lead of the study, published in The Lancet.