Hepatitis C Virus – for GPs, Nurses and Allied Health Professionals

Sonder, October 2018

In this education session, presenters Dr Dep Huynh, Ms Margery Milner and Mr Jeff Stewart will provide attendees with an update on the risk factors associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and the management options available.

The presenters will also provide information on liver cirrhosis tests and how to choose and initiate the most appropriate HCV treatment for patients.

Learning objectives

  • Identify and understand the risk factors for HCV screening;
  • Perform correct diagnosis of chronic HCV using reflexive testing;
  • Assess and manage patients for liver cirrhosis using non-invasive tests;
  • Improve patient safety by choosing the most appropriate HCV treatment according to the patient’s characteristics and co-medications;
  • Discuss and improve your understanding on how to initiate HCV treatment.

Presented by

Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia

Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Agenda

6.30pm – 7.00pm Registration and dinner
7.00pm – 8.00pm Presentation by Dr Dep Huynh, Gastroentrologist & Staff Specialist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Clinical Lecturer, University of South Australia8.00pm – 8.10pm Tea/coffee break
8.10pm – 9.10pm Presentation by Margery Milner & Jeff Stewart, Nurses at Queen Elizabeth Hospital
9.10pm – 9.30pm Questions, evaluation & close

RACGP QI & CPD Category 2, 4 Points

DATE AND TIME

Mon. 5 November 2018

6:15 pm – 9:30 pm ACDT

LOCATION

Arya Restaurant

30/81 O’Connell Street

North Adelaide, SA 5006

This program is funded by the Adelaide Primary Health Network - an Australian Government initiative

 

Australian Health Organisations refute Cochrane Review Report and affirm efficacy of DAA therapy for hepatitis C

Joint position statement, Australia, June 2017

This joint Position Statement aims to strongly refute and reject the findings of the Cochrane Review report titled Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C, published by the Cochrane Hepato‐Biliary Group on 6 June 2017.

The Position Statement was prepared by the expert panel who published a Consensus Statement for Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C for virus infection representing the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (Australian Liver Association), the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, the Australasian Hepatology Association, Hepatitis Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

The organisations above developed this position statement to urge health practitioners and patients not to be swayed by this flawed report claiming new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C do not save lives.

On World Hepatitis Day it’s time to talk about HIV and hepatitis C

National Association of people with HIV Australia, July 28 2016

On World Hepatitis Day, the National Association of People with HIV Australia (NAPWHA), the Australian Federation of AIDS Organisations (AFAO), the Kirby Institute and Hepatitis Australia are raising awareness about HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection.

An estimated 3,000 Australians are living both with HIV and HCV. HCV is more prevalent among people with HIV than in the broader population and is a major risk for health complications in people with HIV. HIV worsens hepatitis C-related liver disease, fastens the progression to cirrhosis, and leads to higher rates of death from both liver failure and liver cancer.

  • Read more by downloading document (MS Word) here: WHDMRFINAL
  • Access NAPHWA’s website here
  • Access Hepatitis SA’s website here

Viral hepatitis kills as many as malaria, TB or HIV/AIDS, finds study

Imperial College London, 06 July 2016

Viral hepatitis has become a leading cause of death and disability across the globe – killing as many people annually as TB, malaria or HIV/AIDS.

This is the finding of new research from scientists at Imperial College London and University of Washington, who analysed data from 183 countries collected between 1990 and 2013.

Read more here

 

Rising Death Toll from Viral Hepatitis in Australia

Hepatitis NSW, September 2015

On 14 September, the Kirby Institute released the HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections in Australia: Annual Surveillance Report 2015. And it made for particularly sobering reading. It is estimated that 690 people died from hepatitis C-related liver disease in 2014, which represents an increase of 146% from ten years earlier.

The number of people with hepatitis C-related severe fibrosis or cirrhosis has also more than doubled over the past decade, from 18,580 in 2004, to an estimated 44,730 in 2014.

And the number of hepatitis C-related deaths, and of people with severe fibrosis or cirrhosis, will only continue to rise unless and until the Commonwealth Government makes new treatments available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

The Kirby Institute also estimated that 395 people lost their lives to hepatitis B-related liver disease last year.

While there was some positive news – finding that “[e]vidence is emerging that the immunisation programs for hepatitis B are starting to have a benefit, with declining rates of new infection, and most strikingly in the younger age groups that have had the highest level of vaccine coverage” – the hepatitis B epidemic presents unique challenges, including:

  • 44% of people living with chronic hepatitis B remain undiagnosed, and
  • Only 27% of people who have been diagnosed are having regular check-ups.

The data also confirmed that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to be disproportionately affected by both hepatitis B and hepatitis C.

  • Full Kirby Institute Surveillance Report >>> Click here
  • Hepatitis NSW Media Release response >>> Click here