‘Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health’ Program: Country South Australia

SHINE SA, March 2019

With rising national rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and in particular chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis, it’s important that SHINE SA support those at the frontline of diagnosis and prevention – general practitioners. SHINE SA has recently been funded by Country SA PHN to deliver a program to support rural and regional health workers.

The Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program aims to help build capacity and skills around sexual health through education, personalised support and information.

Education and training will be offered in regional areas of South Australia and will focus on addressing the current syphilis outbreak and the ongoing chlamydia epidemic.

RAINING AND EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

Through this program SHINE SA will provide opportunities for information, resources, education and training. These opportunities can be both formal and informal depending on needs.

This will include:

  • evening education session/s (see below)
  • webinar and case presentations
  • personalised support including telephone advice
  • information for health practices located in the region
  • increasing access to formal certificate qualifications where relevant

SHINE SA is currently applying for RACGP QI/CPD points for the regional evening education sessions.

REGIONS

This program will reach the following regions:

  • Murray Mallee Region
  • Lower North
  • Mid North & Yorke Peninsula
  • Whyalla
  • Barossa

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers in these regions are encouraged to express interest in receiving training from SHINE SA.

COST

FREE! There is no cost for education and training for those eligible.

TO PARTICIPATE

To express interest in this program please fill out the form here:
Expressions of Interest – Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program

You can also enrol in the free education sessions:

Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies For General Practice
These sessions will give an update of STIs focusing on the current syphilis outbreak and the ongoing chlamydia epidemic.

For any further questions please contact SHINE SA’s Program Lead: Edwina Jachimowicz via email 

COURSE DATES

Murray Bridge – Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies for General Practice

Date: 10 April 2019
Time: 6:15pm registration, 6:45 dinner served, 7:00pm-9:00pm
Location:  Adelaide Road Motor Lodge, 212 Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge SA 5253
Status: Open

ENROL NOW

Berri – Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies for General Practice

Date: 02 May 2019
Time: 6:15pm registration, 6:45 dinner served, 7:00pm-9:00pm
Location: Berri Hotel,Riverview Drive, Berri SA 5343
Status: Open

Expressions of Interest – Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program: Country South Australia

Date: 15 June 2019
Status: Open

EXPRESS INTEREST NOW

Why National Condom Day might be more important than Valentine’s Day: media release

SHINE SA Media Release, 13 February 2019

National Condom Day is 14 February, a day to promote healthy sexual relationships and encourage the use of condoms. Condoms are not only a form of contraception but are also able to protect against STIs. With national rates of STIs rising it’s important that people understand the benefits of condoms.

The benefits of condoms include reducing the risk of unplanned pregnancy and reducing the risk of STIs. They are also available without prescription and are easy to obtain.

Natasha Miliotis SHINE SA’s Chief Executive said:

“Valentine’s Day is also National Condom Day – which reminds us that around one in five young people have chlamydia, but up to 75% will have no symptoms.  Condoms and regular testing protect you and your sexual partner against STIs. We encourage all young people to use condoms as well as get regular sexual health checks from a GP or at our SHINE SA clinics.”

SHINE SA has free condoms at our clinic reception desks and offer free sexual health checks for people under 30.

Update on Sexually Transmitted Infections: forum recording now available

SHINE SA, 17/1/2019

SHINE SA is pleased to present the following Clinical Education Forum on the topic of sexually transmitted infections. This recording is available free of charge, and access is limited to three months only.

This forum covers current trends in sexually transmitted infections and includes recent updates to the Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care.

Presenter: Dr Tonia Mezzini, Sexual Health Physician.

Recording length: 1 hour 25 minutes.

CPD points are awarded on completion of this forum.

To watch the recording click here and sign in – or set up a new account at https://shinesa.trainingvc.com.au/Under ‘Course Categories’ click Clinical Education to find the course STI Update, and then click Enrol Me.

 

Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne viruses in South Australia, 2017

Communicable Disease Control Branch, SA Health, 2018

In 2017, there were 8,181 new notifications of STIs and BBVs in South Australia. This figure represents a 7% increase in the number of new notifications compared to notifications received in 2016, and a 14% increase compared to the five year average (2012-2016).

In 2017, there were 5,910 notifications of genital chlamydia making this the most commonly notified STI in South Australia.  The notification rate of chlamydia in 2017 was 343 per 100,000 population, and has been stable over the past five years.

There were no notifications of donovanosis in 2017.

There were 1,271 notifications of gonorrhoea in 2017. The notification rate of gonorrhoea increased from 45 per 100,000 population in 2014 to 74 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 158 notifications of infectious syphilis in 2017, the highest number of annual notifications in the past 10 years.

There were 60 new diagnoses of HIV infection in 2017. The notification rate of newly diagnosed HIV infection in 2017 was 3.5 per 100,000 population, above that in 2016 of 3.1 per 100,000 population. The notification rate in the Aboriginal population rose to 9.6 per 100,000 in 2017, up from 4.8 per 100,000 in 2016.

There were 11 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis B infection in 2017, above the five year average (2012-2016) of nine cases per year. There were 272 notifications of unspecified hepatitis B virus infection reported in 2017. The notification rate has declined in the Aboriginal population over the past five years.

There were 32 notifications of newly acquired hepatitis C in 2017. The majority of cases were males (75%). The notification rate of unspecified hepatitis C infection was 23 per 100,000 population in 2017.

There were 10 new diagnoses of hepatitis D infection in 2017, which is consistent with the five year average of 10 notifications per year.

 

 

 

 

Giving gay men self-test kits increases HIV testing by 50% – but STI tests decrease

aidsmap/nam, 21 August 2018

Gay men who were offered HIV home-testing kits took 50% more tests than men who only took HIV tests at clinics or community organisations, a randomised controlled study from Seattle in the USA has found.

The men who could self-test took fewer tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), though it is not completely clear whether this was because they went less often for STI checkups or had fewer STI symptoms.

 

Australia’s health 2018 (Report)

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,  Release Date: 

 

Australia’s Health 2018 is the AIHW’s 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots.

The report also summarises the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

Australia’s health 2018: in brief is a companion report to Australia’s health 2018.

Table of contents:

Whole report:

PDF Report (17.3Mb)

Australia’s health 2018 in brief:

Companion ‘in brief’ booklet presents highlights in a compact easy-to-use format.