Cervical cancer self-tests helping to break down barriers and increase screening rates

ABC Health & Wellbeing, Posted Friday 8th March 2019 at 14:54

In Australia, 80 per cent of cervical cancers are found in women who are overdue for screening or have never been screened.

“We know there’s an equity issue in our cervical screening program,” said Dr Saville, executive director of the VCS Foundation, a cervical screening not-for-profit.

“Women from lower socio-economic settings, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, and women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds do not screen as often … and are more likely to get cancer.”

In a bid to overcome these barriers, a self-testing process was introduced to Australia’s National Cervical Screening Program in 2017.

Cervical cancer could be all but eliminated in 80 years: Lancet study

RACGP News, 20 Feb 2019

The Lancet Oncology modelling study found 149 of 181 countries could cut rates of the preventable cancer to four per 100,000 women by the end of the century – the threshold for considering it eliminated as a public health problem.

The study finds that combining high uptake of the vaccine with high screening could prevent up to 13.4 million cases of cervical cancer within 50 years, with the most benefit in low and middle income countries.

 

Cervical Screening Update recording now available!

Quote

SHINE SA, August 2018

SHINE SA is proud to present our pilot Clinical Education Forum recording. This recording is available free of charge,  and access is limited to three months only.

Topic: Cervical Screening Update

Presenters: Megan van Zanten & Dr Amy Moten

The forum ensures your knowledge of the National Cervical Screening Renewed Guidelines is accurate and in line with best practice principles.

  • To watch the recording click the link here and set up a free account/sign in. Under Course Categories click Clinical Education to find the course, and then click Enrol Me. You can now watch the recording.

Media release from SHINE SA: Teen Pregnancy

SHINE SA, Issued: 25 May 2018

Following the release of the Australian Institute of Health and Wellbeing’s Report, that includes the latest figures on teen birth-rates, SHINE SA believes that a decrease in the teen birth-rate as indicated in the report, is a positive outcome from the study.

“A decrease may reflect better sexual health information for young people including education in schools, and better access to sexual health services”, said Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator, Medical Education at SHINE SA.

“Increased access to Long Acting reversible Contraception for young people, as promoted by Family Planning Alliance Australia, is also a significant factor in reducing teen pregnancy rates”, Dr Moten said.

Low socio-economic status can be a marker of poor health outcomes overall. This increases with remoteness from metropolitan areas and Indigenous status. This has been shown in previous studies and also is supported by national data regarding cervical screening that shows that low socio-economic and Indigenous status reduces the rate of screening compared to people from a higher socioeconomic areas.

Social determinants of health are linked to social and economic factors that influence health. Young people from a lower socioeconomic area are likely to have poorer health literacy, lower levels of education and poorer access to health services including contraception. These have all been shown to be linked to an increased birth rate over all ages. Barriers to access health and contraceptive services such as cost and availability of these services increase with distance from metropolitan areas.

“Generally, teen mums often face increased stigma about being a parent and should be supported in their decision to continue parenting”, Dr Moten said.

“At SHINE SA, we provide pregnancy testing, counselling and advice. When a young person is pregnant they can discuss their options and be referred to appropriate services. For a young person continuing to parent we would refer them to the Metropolitan Youth Health Service for example, which has a Young Parenting program”, Dr Moten said.

SHINE SA believes that young mums should be supported to continue their education as completing secondary school after pregnancy has been shown to improve long term outcomes in both mother and child.

Dr Amy Moten, Coordinator Medical Education, SHINE SA
Issued: 25 May 2018

 

How to redesign the vaginal speculum

Guardian, Tue 24 Apr 2018 

Cervical screening is at its lowest rate in 19 years. The Jade Goody effect, named for the increase in women attending screening after the reality TV star died of the disease in 2009, has disappeared. In 2015 and 2016, only 72.7% of eligible women went to a screening when invited. That doesn’t sound too bad, but it means 1.2 million women didn’t attend.

Clinical Education Forums at SHINE SA

SHINE SA, April 2018

SHINE SA hosts regular education sessions focused on clinically relevant issues. These sessions are available for doctors, nurses, midwives and other interested professionals. QI&CPD points can be applied for each session.

Forums include light refreshments, an educational presentation (1.5 hours CPD) and networking opportunities.

SHINE SA is trialling various software and all forums will be recorded and, quality permitting, uploaded for later access.  Presenters will be recorded for video and audio, but audience will be audio recorded only.

UPCOMING CLINICAL FORUMS:

Tuesday 12 June
Topic: Cervical Screening Update
Presenter: Dr Amy Moten
Attendance at this forum will ensure your knowledge of the National Cervical Screening Renewed Guidelines is accurate and in line with best practice principles.  SA Cervix Screening Program will have updated resources available on the day for you to add to your toolbox.

Tuesday 24 July
Topic: Syphilis
Presenter: Dr Danae Kent
This forum will cover recent trends in syphilis infection, syphilis serology and current recommendations for treatment.  Come along and have your questions on this complex infection answered.

Tuesday 18 September
Topic: Update on Sexually Transmitted infections
Presenter: Dr Danae Kent
This forum will cover current trends in sexually transmitted infections and include recent updates to the Australian STI Management Guidelines for Use in Primary Care.

Tuesday 27 November
Topic: Contraception Update
Presenter: Dr Amy Moten
Network with peers before the silly season is upon us while hearing the latest trends and recommendations in contraception.

FORUM DETAILS:

Where: SHINE SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time: 6pm registration with presentations 6.30 – 8.30pm

Fee: No cost to attend

DOWNLOAD FLYER:

Clinical Education Forums flyer

Access to recorded forums:  If you are interested in accessing recorded forums, please email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au with the following information:
1. Forum Topic
2. Your full name
3. Your occupation (doctor, nurse, midwife, other – please state)
4. Your preferred email address