Smoking causes one in five cancers in people with HIV in North America

aidsmap/nam, 22 January 2018

A fifth of all cancers in people receiving HIV care in North America between 2000 and 2015 was due to smoking, according to US research published this month in advance online by the journal AIDS.

“In the United States, the prevalence of smoking among HIV-infected people is substantially higher than in the general population, and most HIV-infected individuals either currently smoke or have previously smoked,” comment the authors. “Our findings indicated that a substantial fraction of cancer diagnoses among HIV-infected individuals potentially would not have occurred if they had never smoked.”

Thanks to improvements in HIV treatment and care, most people with HIV now have a normal or near-normal life expectancy. As these people age, non-AIDS-related cancers are an important cause of death.

More than third of sexual assaults, homicides linked to domestic violence, ABS data shows

ABC News, Updated

More than a third of sexual assaults and homicides recorded in Australia last year were domestic violence-related, according to new figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The 2015 crime statistics also show that there were 21,380 victims of sexual assault across the country, a rise of 3 per cent on the previous year, and a six year high.

Key points:

  • 7,464 people were sexually assaulted within a domestic relationship
  • The majority of family-violence related victims were female
  • Indigenous Australians are far more likely to be the victims of some crime

 

Oral contraceptive use and mortality

ABC Radio National Health Report, Monday 2 February 2015 5:53PM

Researchers from Boston have followed 120,000 female nurses for around 40 years, looking at their health and wellbeing, including their contraception and comparing that to cause and age at death. They wanted to find out whether oral contraceptive use is associated with total and cause specific mortality.

  • Read transcript or download audio here
  • Read original article published in the BMJ here

Age concern in largest ever study of heroin user deaths

University of Manchester, for public release

In the largest study of opioids users ever undertaken, the researchers used records of 198,247 people in England. Opioid users were six times more likely to die prematurely than people in the general population. Almost one in ten of these deaths were due to suicide, more than four times the rate in the general population.

Read more here