International Best Practice Guide to Equality on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Outright, April 2018

Headquartered in New York City, OutRight is the only global LGBTIQ-specific organization with a permanent presence at the United Nations in New York that advocates for human rights progress for LGBTIQ people. This guide highlights promising progress from some countries in early or interim stages of introducing measures which safeguard sexual and gender minorities from harm.

It is intended to offer tools and ideas which can support states considering how to ensure equality for sexual and gender minorities. As there is no one way to ensure equality, this guide explores different countries that have initiated different solutions suitable to their national contexts.

Table of Contents:

Introduction
Reforming Laws and Policies
Constitutional Protections
Case Study: Fiji
Law Reform
Case Study: Botswana
Improving Health Outcomes
Case Study: Jamaica
National Leadership Statements
Changing Attitudes
Case Study: Pakistan
Legislation Inspiring Policy Reform
Case Study: Belize
Holistic Reforms
Case Study: Malta
Conclusions

Download report International Best Practice Guide to Equality on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

‘Patient zero’ Gaëtan Dugas not source of HIV outbreak, study confirms

Guardian, 27 Oct 2017

Scientists have managed to reconstruct the route by which HIV arrived in the US – exonerating once and for all the man long blamed for the ensuing pandemic in the west.

Using sophisticated genetic techniques, an international team of researchers have revealed that the virus emerged from a pre-existing epidemic in the Caribbean, arrived in New York by the early 1970s and then spread westwards across the US.

  • Read more here 
  • Access Nature article (full text) here 

 

A qualitative study exploring social support group participation among LGBT migrants and refugees in Canada

“It’s for us –newcomers, LGBTQ persons, and HIV-positive persons. You feel free to be”: a qualitative study exploring social support group participation among African and Caribbean lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender newcomers and refugees in Toronto, Canada

BMC International Health and Human Rights
201616:18DOI: 10.1186/s12914-016-0092-0

Background

Stigma and discrimination harm the wellbeing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people and contribute to migration from contexts of sexual persecution and criminalization. Yet LGBT newcomers and refugees often face marginalization and struggles meeting the social determinants of health (SDOH) following immigration to countries such as Canada. Social isolation is a key social determinant of health that may play a significant role in shaping health disparities among LGBT newcomers and refugees. Social support may moderate the effect of stressors on mental health, reduce social isolation, and build social networks. Scant research, however, has examined social support groups targeting LGBT newcomers and refugees. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore experiences of social support group participation among LGBT African and Caribbean newcomers and refugees in an urban Canadian city.

Conclusions

Findings suggest that social support groups tailored for LGBT African and Caribbean newcomers and refugees can address social isolation, community resilience, and enhance resource access. Health care providers can provide support groups, culturally and LGBT competent health services, and resource access to promote LGBT newcomers and refugees’ health and wellbeing.

  • Full text (open source) here