‘Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health’ Program: Country South Australia

SHINE SA, March 2019

With rising national rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and in particular chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis, it’s important that SHINE SA support those at the frontline of diagnosis and prevention – general practitioners. SHINE SA has recently been funded by Country SA PHN to deliver a program to support rural and regional health workers.

The Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program aims to help build capacity and skills around sexual health through education, personalised support and information.

Education and training will be offered in regional areas of South Australia and will focus on addressing the current syphilis outbreak and the ongoing chlamydia epidemic.

RAINING AND EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

Through this program SHINE SA will provide opportunities for information, resources, education and training. These opportunities can be both formal and informal depending on needs.

This will include:

  • evening education session/s (see below)
  • webinar and case presentations
  • personalised support including telephone advice
  • information for health practices located in the region
  • increasing access to formal certificate qualifications where relevant

SHINE SA is currently applying for RACGP QI/CPD points for the regional evening education sessions.

REGIONS

This program will reach the following regions:

  • Murray Mallee Region
  • Lower North
  • Mid North & Yorke Peninsula
  • Whyalla
  • Barossa

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers in these regions are encouraged to express interest in receiving training from SHINE SA.

COST

FREE! There is no cost for education and training for those eligible.

TO PARTICIPATE

To express interest in this program please fill out the form here:
Expressions of Interest – Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program

You can also enrol in the free education sessions:

Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies For General Practice
These sessions will give an update of STIs focusing on the current syphilis outbreak and the ongoing chlamydia epidemic.

For any further questions please contact SHINE SA’s Program Lead: Edwina Jachimowicz via email 

COURSE DATES

Murray Bridge – Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies for General Practice

Date: 10 April 2019
Time: 6:15pm registration, 6:45 dinner served, 7:00pm-9:00pm
Location:  Adelaide Road Motor Lodge, 212 Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge SA 5253
Status: Open

ENROL NOW

Berri – Sexually Transmitted Infections – Strategies for General Practice

Date: 02 May 2019
Time: 6:15pm registration, 6:45 dinner served, 7:00pm-9:00pm
Location: Berri Hotel,Riverview Drive, Berri SA 5343
Status: Open

Expressions of Interest – Building Workforce Capacity in Sexual Health Program: Country South Australia

Date: 15 June 2019
Status: Open

EXPRESS INTEREST NOW

Leadership Training Academy 2018 is coming

The Equality Project Australia, August 2018

In order to achieve meaningful social change we need to foster the training of a new generation of LGBTIQ+ advocates to lead the conversation, reshape the narrative, and ultimately, change the culture.

The Equality Project’s Leadership Training Academy (#LTA2018) is a specialised leadership and media engagement training program for LGBTIQ+ change-makers and emerging community leaders who want to build the core skills and techniques to effect positive social change.

They have compiled an exciting curriculum that includes programs from some of the largest LGBTIQ+ rights organisations in the world. These include the world-class GLAAD Media Institute and the Stonewall LGBTIQ Role Models program.

The Leadership Training Academy is designed for LGBTIQ+ advocates and emerging community leaders as well as professionals from any sector or industry who want to explore what it means to be an authentic and inclusive LGBTIQ+ role model in the workplace.

They are looking for a diverse range of participants particularly those who are from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, people of faith, people with a disability, women and non-binary people – and those at the intersections of these identities.

With the support of sponsors and training partners, the two 2-day leadership training program is one of the most affordable in the country. But if you are unable to attend due to cost they encourage you to apply for a scholarship.

Morning tea, afternoon tea and lunch included on both days.

The Leadership Training Academy will be held in October 2018 in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Canberra.

 

Job vacancy: SAMESH Health Promotion Officer

Thorne Harbour Health / SHINE SA, August 2018

You are a highly motivated leader who is passionate about, and experienced in working to improve the sexual health and wellbeing of LGBTI communities. You’re a collaborative team player who is focused and outcome oriented.

The South Australia Mobilisation and Empowerment for Sexual Health (SAMESH) program delivers a range of health promotion strategies targeting gay men, people living with HIV and/or affected communities. The program is a partnership between Thorne Harbour Health (formerly VAC) and SHINE SA.

The Health Promotion Officer will work with a small team to design, implement and evaluate a diverse range of health promotion and community development projects in Adelaide and regional South Australia.

For a detailed position description, including selection criteria, click on the attachment below.

For further information, contact Matthew Tyne, SAMESH Team Leader, on 0429 188 733

How to apply

Applications close Monday, 3rd September 2018 and should be marked ‘Confidential Recruitment; SAMESH Health Promotion Officer application’, addressed to Matthew Tyne and emailed to recruitment@thorneharbour.org

Members of the LGBTI community, people living with HIV and those with past lived experience of recovery from alcohol and other drug issues and people with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Generous salary packaging and a commitment to quality improvement and professional development are on offer.

 

Behavioural Support Practice Guides for young people with a disability

University of NSW

University of NSW’s Intellectual Disability Behavioural Support Program has released practice guides for behaviour support programs for young people with a disability.

  • Being a planner with a person with disability and complex support needs

This Planning Resource Kit is intended to strengthen existing good practice and to provide guidance for engaging a person with complex support needs in planning. The kit is aimed at workers in planning or related roles, such as case managers or service coordinators, who engage with people with complex support needs.

  • Understanding behaviour support practice guide: children 0-8 years

The purpose of this guide is to assist in the prevention and reduction of the development of challenging behaviour in young children aged 0–8 years. The development of challenging behaviour can place additional strain on families and support systems and their capacity to provide effective support to the child. It is intended that this material will assist support networks to address early stages of the development of challenging behaviour and to maintain capacity for effective support.

  • Understanding behaviour support practice guide: children 9-18 years

The purpose of this guide is to assist in the prevention and reduction of the development of challenging behaviour in children and young people aged 9–18 years. The development of challenging behaviour can place additional strain on families and support systems and their capacity to provide effective support to the child/young person. It is intended that this guide will assist support networks to address early stages of the development of challenging behaviour and to maintain capacity for effective support

 

Uptake of long-acting, reversible contraception in three remote Aboriginal communities: a population-based study

Med J Aust 2016; 205 (1): 21-25. doi: 10.5694/mja16.00073

Objective: To assess the use, effectiveness and acceptance of prescribed contraception in three remote Western Australian Aboriginal communities

Conclusion: The high uptake of LARCs in these communities is consistent with international recommendations about contraception use. High acceptability was reflected in excellent continuation rates. Service delivery models that use community engagement and capacity building are recommended for broadening the focus of sexual health beyond sexually transmitted disease detection and management, giving priority to the reproductive rights and unmet needs of Aboriginal women.

  • Access Journal article here (if you cannot access the full text, please contact your librarian for assistance)

Preparing for work with children and young people who inject drugs

 International Harm Reduction Association, 2016

Globally, the protection and care of children and young people who inject drugs receives little attention. It is a controversial and often misunderstood issue and one that is severely under-funded. Global research presents shocking figures and evidence of restrictive laws preventing young people from accessing harm reduction. Rarely are services developed with children under 18 in mind, and organisations often lack capacity to attend to this highly vulnerable group. Young people also report experiencing significant barriers to accessing harm reduction services when they are under 18 due to a number of factors, including staff attitudes and organisational policies and practices.

This tool is a product of a partnership between Harm Reduction International (HRI), Youth Rise, International HIV/AIDS Alliance and Save the Children and was developed in response to HRI research on injecting drug use among under 18s globally that highlighted gaps in the response for this group.

This resource is intended for harm reduction service providers with limited experience of working with children and young people who inject drugs. It sets out a process that you can go through quickly, with little cost, to prepare for work with children and young people who are under 18. It is designed to help your organisation and staff to feel safe in commencing this work, and to support you in thinking through the challenging situations and decisions that you face. In some cases, it may lead you to decide that you are not yet ready to go ahead with this work.

Contents:

Step 1: Exploring attitudes and sharing concerns
Step 2: Assessing the policy and legal environment
Step 3: Understanding key principles for working with children and young people
Step 4: Exploring your current capacity to work with children and young people who inject drugs
Step 5: Assessing the needs of children and young people who inject drugs
Step 6: Determining your organisation’s capacity to provide key services
Step 7: Mapping other available services
Step 8: Considering the impacts on staff
Step 9: Policies to assist children and young people who inject drugs
Step 10: Developing your policy

Download tool (PDF) here