New resources from SIN

SIN (South Australian Adult Industry Workers Association), February 2018

The posters below were originally designed in an effort to engage migrant students with SIN’s services. However, they are not restricted to students, and may be a beneficial engagement tool in many environments.  Please feel free to distribute these to any setting where you feel they may be beneficial – with a particular focus on tertiary settings. 

SIN also has a CALD project worker, providing outreach, peer education, information, referrals, support, advocacy and safer sex supplies to migrant sex workers and sex workers from non-English speaking backgrounds. Suree is a Thai speaking peer educator available for support on all the issues that affect sex workers.

The CALD project holds social and educational events throughout the year, such as dinners, bingo nights, skill shares and workshops. Peer engagements, intensive assistance and new worker trainings are also offered by SIN’s CALD project worker.

Project Worker: Suree

Office: (08) 8351 7626 / Mobile: 0450 847 626 / Email: cald@sin.org.au

Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 1:30pm – 5:00pm, and Friday 10:00am – 5:00pm

 

Baby boomers re-entering dating game more vulnerable to STIs

PM, ABC radio, 18/01/2018

Family Planning New South Wales surveyed 2,339 heterosexual men who were using an online dating service in 2014.

The survey found men aged 50 or older were less likely to use condoms and more likely than younger men to think that condoms reduced sexual interest.

The survey also found 49 per cent of men over 60 did not know that Australia’s most prevalent sexually transmitted infection (STI), chlamydia, often does not cause any symptoms.

Sex Industry Network (SIN) events for FEAST festival

SIN, November 2017

SIN is the South Australian Sex Industry Network.

SIN is run by sex workers for sex workers and offers peer support, education, information, advocacy and referral services for sex workers.

SIN has two events scheduled for FEAST. These events are open to the general public.

1. SIN Retrospective

This multimedia retrospective by sex workers showcases projects, posters and artwork exploring the realities of trans, male, female and street-based sex workers across ages and cultural backgrounds.

When: from Thurs 9th- Mon 27th Nov, 11am – 10pm daily

(Opening night is Wed 8th Nov 5:30-7:30)

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hote

2. Ask a Sex Worker a Question

Step into the Fantasy Brothel confidential confessional and ask a sex worker everything you always wanted to know about sex work but were too afraid to ask.

2 sessions:

Wed 15th Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Wed 22nd Nov
4-6pm and 7-9pm

Where: Upstairs at the Edinburgh Castle Hotel

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Authors

Denton Callander, PhD,*† Hamish McManus, PhD,* Rebecca Guy, PhD,* Margaret Hellard, PhD,‡ Catherine C. O’Connor, DrPH,*§¶ Christopher K. Fairley, PhD,||** Eric P.F. Chow, PhD,||** Anna McNulty, MM,†† David A. Lewis, DA, PhD,‡‡§§ Christopher Carmody, MB, BS,¶¶ Heather-Marie A. Schmidt, PhD,|||| Jules Kim,*** and Basil Donovan, MD*††

From the *The Kirby Institute, †Centre for Social Research in Health,
UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW; ‡Burnet Institute, Melbourne, VIC;
§RPA Sexual Health Clinic, Community Health, Sydney Local Health
District; ¶Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW;
||Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health; **Central Clinical
School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash
University, Melbourne, VIC; ††Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Sydney Hospital, Sydney; ‡‡Western Sydney Sexual Health Centre,
Parramatta; §§Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and
Biosecurity & Sydney Medical School-Westmead, University of
Sydney, Sydney; ¶¶Liverpool Sexual Health Centre, Liverpool; ||||
New South Wales Ministry of Health; and ***Scarlet Alliance, Australian
Sex Worker Association, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Abstract:

Background: Female sex workers in Australia have achieved some of the lowest documented prevalences of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmissible infections globally but rates overall are increasing in Australia and warrant closer investigation.

Methods: We constructed a retrospective cohort using repeat testing data extracted from a network of 42 sexual health clinics. Poisson and Cox regression were used to determined trends in incidence and risk factors for HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and infectious syphilis among female sex workers.

Results: From 2009 to 2015, 18,475 women reporting sex work attended a participating service. The overall incidence of urogenital chlamydia was 7.7/100 person years (PY), declining by 38% from 2009 to 2013 before increasing by 43% to 2015 (P < 0.001); anorectal chlamydia incidence was 0.6/100 PY, and pharyngeal was 1.9/100 PY, which increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001, both). For gonorrhoea, the urogenital incidence was 1.4/100 PY, anorectal incidence was 0.3/100 PY, P < 0.001), and 3.6/100 PY for pharyngeal; urogenital incidence doubled during the study period, anorectal increased fivefold, and pharyngeal more than tripled (P < 0.001, all). Incidence of infectious syphilis was 0.4/100 PY, which remained stable from 2009 to 2015 (P = 0.09). There were seven incident infections of HIV among female sex workers (0.1/100 PY). Inconsistent condom use with private partners, higher number of private partner numbers, recent injecting drug use, younger age, and country of birth variously predicted sexually transmissible infections among female sex workers.

Conclusions: Although infectious syphilis and HIV remain uncommon in female sex workers attending Australian sexual health clinics, the increasing incidence of gonorrhoea across anatomical sites and increasing chlamydia after a period of decline demands enhanced health promotion initiatives.

DOWNLOAD full text

Rising Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea Incidence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sex Workers in Australia: A Retrospective Cohort Study (PDF)

Hepatitis A in MSM

SA Health / SHINE SA, October 2017

An increase in the number of notifications of hepatitis A has been reported in New South Wales amongst men who have sex with men (MSM). It is suspected that these infections are associated with a recent outbreak overseas amongst MSM in Europe and the Americas.

Key prevention messages:

  • Vaccination is the most effective form of prevention against hepatitis A infection. To receive the vaccine, contact your health care provider to arrange an appointment.
  • Follow good personal hygiene practices, especially thorough hand washing and safe sexual practices.
  • People with hepatitis A are excluded from work for 7 days after the onset of jaundice (if present) or 2 weeks from the onset of illness.

A factsheet and 2 videos of different lengths have been developed.

Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician, Head of Unit, STD Services, Clinic 275 (RAH), discusses the importance of vaccination against Hepatitis A for men who have sex with men (MSM) (3:08 Minutes)

Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician, Head of Unit, STD Services, Clinic 275 (RAH), discusses the importance of vaccination against Hepatitis A for men who have sex with men (MSM) (47 seconds)

New periodic survey on sexual health among young heterosexual people

Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, 2017

Between December 2015 and March 2016, the ‘It’s Your Love Life’ periodic survey recruited 2,120 heterosexually-identified young people aged 15–29 years and living in New South Wales (NSW). The data collected through the survey contributes new knowledge on the attitudes and practices of heterosexual young people and their exposure to sexual health promotion initiatives.

Results indicate that substantial effort is required to support heterosexual young people in ensuring their sexual health.

Contents include:

  • Knowledge of sexually transmissible infections (STIs)
  • Perceived severity of STIs
  • Perceived risk of contracting an STI
  • Condom use-related views
  • Carrying condoms while being on a date
  • Sexual intercourse with and without condoms
  • Contraception
  • STI testing-related views
  • Testing for STIs and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Exposure to messages promoting condom use and testing for STIs
  • Familiarity and engagement with sexual health promotion resources, activities and services
  • Sexual health education in secondary schools

IYLL is an online cross-sectional survey that will be repeated annually. A first round of data collection was completed between December 2015 and March 2016