Measuring & addressing the prevalence & health impacts of intimate partner violence in Australian women

ANROWS,  30th October 2016

Intimate partner violence, including violence in both cohabiting and non-cohabiting relationships and emotional abuse:

  • is prevalent–affecting one in three women since the age of 15. One in four women have experienced violence or abuse from a cohabiting partner. If we only consider physical and sexual violence, then one in six women have experienced at least one incident of violence by a cohabiting partner;
  • has serious impacts for women’s health–contributing to a range of negative health outcomes, including poor mental health, problems during pregnancy and birth, alcohol and illicit drug use, suicide, injuries and homicide;
  • contributes an estimated 5.1 percent to the disease burden in Australian women aged 18-44 years and 2.2% of the burden in women of all ages;
  • contributes more to the burden than any other risk factor in women aged 18-44 years, more than well known risk factors like tobacco use, high cholesterol or use of illicit drugs;
  • is estimated to contribute five times more to the burden of disease among Indigenous than non-Indigenous women;
  • is estimated to make a larger contribution than any other risk factor to the gap in the burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women aged 18-44 years;2 and
  • has serious consequences for the development and wellbeing of children living with violence.

There has been no decrease in the prevalence or health burden of intimate partner violence since both were last measured in Australia.

Intimate partner violence and its health impacts are preventable.

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WHO launches new treatment guidelines for chlamydia, gonorrhoea & syphilis

World Health Organisation, 30 August 2016

STIs present a major burden of disease and negatively affect people’s well-being across the globe. Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis are three STIs which are all caused by bacteria and which can potentially be cured by antibiotics. Unfortunately, these STIs often go undiagnosed and due to antibiotic resistance, they are also becoming increasingly difficult to treat.

WHO has today launched new treatment guidelines to help address this issue. Based on the latest available evidence, the guidelines share new recommendations on the most effective treatments for these curable sexually transmitted infections.

Viral hepatitis kills as many as malaria, TB or HIV/AIDS, finds study

Imperial College London, 06 July 2016

Viral hepatitis has become a leading cause of death and disability across the globe – killing as many people annually as TB, malaria or HIV/AIDS.

This is the finding of new research from scientists at Imperial College London and University of Washington, who analysed data from 183 countries collected between 1990 and 2013.

Read more here