He, she, or … ? Gender-neutral pronouns reduce biases – study

The Guardian, Tue 6 Aug 2019 

A new study has found that using a gender-neutral pronoun reduces mental biases that favour men, and boosts positive feelings towards women and LGBT people.

The finding marks an easy win, the researchers believe, and shows how a minor change in language can help chip away at long-standing gender inequities.

 

HIV Criminal Cases: Media Guide

AFAO, Updated 2016

In Australia, each state/territory has different criminal laws under which someone can be charged with reckless, negligent or deliberate transmission of HIV to another person (generally for sexual transmission), or for exposing another person to HIV. Criminal cases in Australia involving HIV transmission or exposure are rare.

The quality of Australian media reports of criminal cases involving HIV transmission or exposure varies: on some occasions it has been accurate but on others media reports have been inaccurate  or overtly sensational.

The effect of sensationalised reporting that misrepresent the facts is that it can feed misconceptions regarding transmission and risk, dehumanise the people involved in the cases and demonise all people with HIV.

The Media Tool Kit as a whole contains the following topics:

  • Reporting on HIV prevention
  • Reporting on PrEP
  • Reporting HIV data
  • HIV cure research
  • HIV criminal cases
  • HIV exposure risk in the community
  • Reporting HIV: best practice tips +
  • Ethics and principles for HIV reporting
  • Background briefings
  • Media releases
  • HIV timeline

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Does attractiveness influence condom use intentions in heterosexual men? An experimental study

BMJ Open, 2016;6:e010883 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-01088, 17 June 2016

Abstract

Objectives Judgements of attractiveness have been shown to influence the character of social interactions. The present study sought to better understand the relationship between perceived attractiveness, perceived sexual health status and condom use intentions in a heterosexual male population.

Setting The study employed an electronic questionnaire to collect all data, during face-to-face sessions.

Participants 51 heterosexual, English-speaking men aged between 18 and 69 years.

Outcome measures Men were asked to rate the attractiveness of 20 women on the basis of facial photographs, to estimate the likelihood that each woman had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and to indicate their willingness to have sex with or without a condom with each woman.

Results The more attractive a woman was judged to be on average, the more likely participants would be willing to have sex with her (p<0.0001) and the less likely they were to intend to use a condom during sex (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that higher condom use intentions towards a particular woman were associated with lower ratings of her attractiveness (p<0.0005), higher ratings of her STI likelihood (p<0.0001), the participant being in an exclusive relationship (p=0.002), having a less satisfactory sex life (p=0.015), lower age (p=0.001), higher number of sexual partners (p=0.001), higher age at first intercourse (p=0.002), higher rates of condomless sex in the last 12 months (p<0.043) and lower confidence in their ability to assess whether or not a woman had an STI (p=0.001). The more attractive a participant judged himself to be, the more he believed that other men like him would engage in condomless sex (p=0.001) and the less likely he was to intend to use a condom himself (p=0.02).

Conclusions Male perceptions of attractiveness influence their condom use intentions; such risk biases could profitably be discussed during sex education sessions and in condom use promotion interventions.

Full text of paper (Open Access) available here

NB: The sample size of this study is small and not very diverse 

How Heteronormative Paradigms Ostracize Queer Populations in Intimate Partner Violence Research

Huffpost Queer Voices Blog, 02/09/2016

Today, most research investigating IPV and other forms of sexual and partner violence focuses on heterosexual women as victims and heterosexual men as perpetrators, a notion that is justifiable in the realms of empirical evidence. However, when focusing on development, implementation and evaluation of effective intervention strategies to address IPV, current models are subject to heteronormative biases under the dominant gender binary paradigm.

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