HIV and hepatitis pre and post test discussion in Victoria: consultation report

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Nov 2017

In February 2017, the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University initiated a consultation which aimed to describe best practice in HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C pre and post test discussion in the Victorian context.

Building on existing evidence, and guided by the National Testing Policies, the purpose of this consultation was to better understand the components of a quality testing encounter in the era of elimination, with particular emphasis on the non-medical needs of people around the time of testing and diagnosis.

The focus of this consultation was to identify best practice in pre and post test discussion for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. A range of health and community providers and researchers discussed the fundamentals of best practice at length, and provided a great many insights into the components of quality testing services.
Importantly, most participants acknowledged that while best practice is a valuable notion, it is not attainable in all health care settings. Best practice, therefore, needs to be flexible enough to be able to fit into any setting where HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C testing may occur.

 

Australian Health Organisations refute Cochrane Review Report and affirm efficacy of DAA therapy for hepatitis C

Joint position statement, Australia, June 2017

This joint Position Statement aims to strongly refute and reject the findings of the Cochrane Review report titled Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C, published by the Cochrane Hepato‐Biliary Group on 6 June 2017.

The Position Statement was prepared by the expert panel who published a Consensus Statement for Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C for virus infection representing the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (Australian Liver Association), the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, the Australasian Society for HIV, Viral Hepatitis and Sexual Health Medicine, the Australasian Hepatology Association, Hepatitis Australia and the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

The organisations above developed this position statement to urge health practitioners and patients not to be swayed by this flawed report claiming new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C do not save lives.

HOW2 Create LGBTI Inclusive Services: 2017 dates announced

SHINE SA, April 2017

The 2017 round of SHINE SA’s HOW2 Create Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) Inclusive Services program commences next month.

By enrolling your organisation in this program, key staff in your organisation will gain the knowledge and skills to drive organisational change to become safer and more inclusive for LGBTI clients, staff and communities. Your organisation will benefit immediately from the implementation of practical exercises in the workplace and completion of the HOW2 program will lay the foundations for successfully achieving Rainbow Tick Accreditation.

One of our 2016 round participants, Kay Goodman-Dodd of Eldercare, told us of the impact the program has had on her organisation:

“The action plan that we developed over the course of the HOW2 program has enabled us to raise awareness, educate staff, consult community and promote our service as LGBTI inclusive. As participants, we felt supported to go back to our organisations and identify, promote and support manageable change. We are excited to be working toward our commitment to undertake Rainbow Tick accreditation and will continue to benefit from the networks we established during the program.”

The HOW2 program is based on a set of 6 national standards developed by Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV), in conjunction with QIP (Quality, Innovation & Performance), known as Rainbow Tick Accreditation.

  • The 2017 HOW2 program commences on 18 May. Please click here to find out more and enrol.

 

Interpersonal violence & LGBTIQ communities: Understanding & responding to experiences of LGBTIQ clients

Addressing Violence Alliance (AVA)

Featuring experts and dynamic guest speakers on current best practice policies and practice when working with LGBTIQ communities and their experiences of violence.

This forum will cover policy & research perspectives, organizational & practitioner perspectives, as well as gaps and future advocacy goals.

Including
· Dr Niki Vincent (Commissioner for Equal Opportunity)
· Dr Philomena Horsley – Gay & Lesbian Health Victoria (La Trobe University)
· Dr. Damien Riggs (Flinders University)
· Personal Story
· Worker Wellbeing session

Who should attend?
Policy makers, managers, team leaders and front-line staff working in the area of supporting victims of violence and/or with members of LGBTIQ communities.

Why
A NSW Study found 85% of the lesbian and gay community in NSW had experienced homophobic abuse, harassment or violence during their life. (1) LGBTIQ people are also as likely to be victims of domestic and family violence as non-LGBTIQ women, which equates to approximately 1 in 3. (2)
1. Attorney General’s Department NSW, 2003
2. LGBTIQ D&FV Interagency and University of NSW, 2014

Tickets

$50 from http://ywca.com.au/avaforum2017/

Where
Victim Support Service
33 Franklin Street, Adelaide
When
Thursday 20 April 2017, 8:30am – 4:30pm
Contact
Clare Tatyzo T: 08 8203 9413
E: Claire.Tatyzo@ywca.com.au

Who

The Addressing Violence Alliance (AVA) is a collaborative partnership between a number of lead agencies in the community services, health and criminal justice sectors. AVA is committed to increasing the capacity of the South Australian workforce in responding to and preventing violence.

Download flyer here AVA LGBTIQ Forum 2017

Improving Cultural Understanding & Engagement with People from ATSI Communities

Improving Cultural Understanding and Engagement with people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: Practical learnings to improve your practice (Webinar)

1800RESPECT , October 2016

The details

When: Thursday, December 1, 2016

What Time: 01:00 PM AEDT

Duration: 45 minutes

Where: Online – wherever you like!

Presenter: Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Cost: Free!

What’s your timezone?

NSW, ACT, VIC, TAS: 1.00 pm – 1.45pm

SA: 12.30 pm – 1.15 pm

QLD: 12.00 pm – 12.45 pm

NT: 11.30 pm – 12.15 pm

WA: 10.00 am – 11.45 pm

About the webinar

Family violence is a serious problem for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around the nation. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised and twice as likely to die as an outcome of family violence compared to other Australian women. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are over nine times as likely to be on care and protection orders and ten times more likely to be in out of home care than non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. There are also lower reporting rates as women are known to face specific and additional barriers to reporting in their communities. The impacts of family violence are compounded by the fact that survivors of violence may not have access to culturally appropriate services or supports, may be distrustful of the justice system, and already experience significant socioeconomic disadvantage and marginalisation.

This webinar will explore the complexities of domestic and Aboriginal family violence, provide insights into greater Aboriginal cultural competency and community engagement, and share best practice approaches to recognising and responding for frontline workers across all sectors.

You can make a difference by watching this webinar and finding out what you can do to help break the cycle of violence, and increase the safety of women and children.

Craig Ridney CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY)

Craig is currently the CEO of Kornar Winmil Yunti (KWY) an Aboriginal not for profit organisation based in Adelaide that works closely with the specialist homelessness and domestic violence services state wide.

Craig currently holds a range of representative positions including the Minister appointed – Aboriginal Community Leadership Reference Group – providing crucial advice regarding the government response to the Nyland Child Protection Systems Royal Commission Report to cabinet, South Australian Council of Social Services (SACOSS), the Coalition of Women’s Domestic Violence Services and the Coalition for Men Supporting Non-Violence.

He recently launched The Aboriginal Family Violence Program (AFVP) focusing on women who want to stay in their relationships. The program recognises the importance of culturally appropriate safety responses for Aboriginal women and children experiencing family violence.

Register here 

Exciting new program starts this month: HOW2 create a LGBTI inclusive service

SHine SA, September 1 2016

Have you heard all the buzz around Rainbow Tick Accreditation or ever considered how your organisation ensures it is inclusive of diversity? Perhaps you have organisational goals or targets regarding diversity and inclusion and are looking for ways to achieve these? Are you looking for ways to improve the safety and quality of your services to the community?

The HOW2 program was created to guide organisations through a range of practical steps and activities to increase their knowledge, capacity and understanding in relation to LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) cultural safety and inclusion. It also supports organisations who are looking to achieve Rainbow Tick Accreditation, joining the growing number of organisations who are taking up this opportunity across the nation.

South Australia’s first How2 program starts this month on 22nd September: we still have places left!