New ‘Syphilis Is Still Out There’ Campaign for Health Professionals

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) & SHINE SA, May 2020

The Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) and SHINE SA have released a new social media campaign for health professionals.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of syphilis screening and treatment during COVID-19.

  • Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign for Health Professionals

While we deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the syphilis outbreak in South Australia continues. It’s essential that we continue to test, treat, cure and notify partners during this time.

To learn more visit www.shinesa.org.au/syphilisoutbreak

  • Social Media Tiles and Posters

To help support this campaign and reinforce key messages around syphilis prevention and treatment, we have a range of social media tiles and posters to download.

Help us share this campaign by downloading our social media tiles to share on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn. Use the hashtag #SyphilisIsStillOutThere

Download the files here as a zipped folder: Syphilis Is Still Out There Campaign

Key Messages of this Campaign 

  • Syphilis is still out there #SyphilisIsStillOutThere
  • Syphilis outbreak minimised in 4 steps: test, treat, cure and notify partners
  • Syphilis is still threatening unborn children. Know when to test before, during and after pregnancy

  • For the Community

Stay tuned: whilst this campaign is aimed at health professionals, AHCSA are currently producing resources to share on social media targeted towards community members.

To stay up-to-date follow AHCSA on Facebook.

 

Webinar: Syphilis Outbreak in the Indigenous Community

SHINE SA, posted May 14, 2020

This free education session is presented by Adelaide Sexual Health Centre and will provide an update on syphilis.

General practitioners, nurses and/or midwives, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and Aboriginal Health Workers are encouraged to register for this training.

COURSE DETAILS

Date: 16 June 2020
Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm

The webinar will cover:

  • Update on epidemiology
  • Review of diagnosis, staging and management of syphilis cases
  • How to interpret syphilis serology
  • Syphilis in pregnancy
  • Approaches to Partner Notification
  • Introduction to the South Australian Syphilis Register

Presenters:
Dr Alison Ward, Senior Consultant Sexual Health Physician
Njirrah Rowe, Aboriginal STI Education Coordinator and Partner Notification Officer

This activity is pending RACGP approval for 4 CPD activity points

This session is part of the Syphilis Outbreak Response and is a partnership between SHINE SA and Adelaide Sexual Health Centre.

No cost to attend.

Internet-based self-sampling for Chlamydia trachomatis testing

Söderqvist JGullsby KStark L, et al
Internet-based self-sampling for Chlamydia trachomatis testing: a national evaluation in Sweden

Abstract:

Objective Internet-based testing for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) with self-sampling at home has gradually been implemented in Sweden since 2006 as a free-of-charge service within the public healthcare system. This study evaluated the national diagnostic outcome of this service.

Methods Requests for data on both self-sampling at home and clinic-based sampling for CT testing were sent to the laboratories in 18 of 21 counties. Four laboratories were also asked to provide data on testing patterns at the individual level for the years 2013–2017.

Results The proportion of self-sampling increased gradually from 2013, comprising 22.0% of all CT tests in Sweden in 2017. In an analysis of 14 counties (representing 83% of the population), self-sampling increased by 115% between 2013 and 2017 for women, compared with 71% for men, while test volumes for clinic-based sampling were fairly constant for both sexes (1.8% increase for women, 15% increase for men). In 2017 self-sampling accounted for 20.3% of all detected CT cases, and the detection rate was higher than, but similar to, clinic-based testing (5.5% vs 5.1%). The proportion of self-sampling men was also higher, but similar (33.7% vs 30.8%). Analysis of individual testing patterns in four counties over 5 years showed a higher proportion of men using self-sampling only (67%, n=10 533) compared with women (40%, n=8885).

Conclusions Self-sampling has increased substantially in recent years, especially among women. This service is at least as beneficial as clinic-based screening for detection of CT, and self-sampling reaches men more than clinic-based testing.

New Videos for Clinicians – Syphilis: Symptoms, Serology, and Treatment

SHINE SA, 14/02/2020

SHINE SA have released two new short videos that provide advice for clinicians on syphilis symptoms and treatment. This resource expands on our syphilis overview for clinicians. 

The videos are presented by Sexual Health Physician Dr Carole Khaw, and cover the topics of signs, symptoms and stages as well as serology and treatment.

With an increase in syphilis cases in South Australia it is important that health professionals understand how to identify and treat syphilis.

If you would like to share this with your networks easily, you can use the email, Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter share buttons at the bottom of this post!

 

 

 

Kissing may be an important and neglected risk factor for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea

Kissing may be an important and neglected risk factor for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea: a cross-sectional study in men who have sex with men

Chow EPFCornelisse VJWilliamson DA, et al

Abstract:

Objectives A mathematical model suggested that a significant proportion of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea cases are acquired via oropharynx-to-oropharynx transmission (ie, tongue-kissing), but to date, no empirical study has investigated this. This study aimed to examine the association between kissing and oropharyngeal gonorrhoea among gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM).

Methods MSM attending a public sexual health centre in Melbourne, Australia, between March 2016 and February 2017 were invited to participate in a brief survey that collected data on their number of male partners in the last 3 months, in three distinct categories: kissing-only (ie, no sex including no oral and/or anal sex), sex-only (ie, any sex without kissing), and kissing-with-sex (ie, kissing with any sex). Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between oropharyngeal gonorrhoea positivity by nucleic acid amplification tests and the three distinct partner categories.

Results A total of 3677 men completed the survey and were tested for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. Their median age was 30 (IQR 25–37) and 6.2% (n=229) had oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. Men had a mean number of 4.3 kissing-only, 1.4 sex-only, and 5.0 kissing-with-sex partners in the last 3 months. Kissing-only and kissing-with-sex were associated with oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, but sex-only was not. The adjusted odds for having oropharyngeal gonorrhoea were 1.46-fold (95% CI 1.04 to 2.06) for men with ≥4 kissing-only partners and 1.81-fold (95% CI 1.17 to 2.79) for men with ≥4 kissing-with-sex partners.

Conclusions These data suggest that kissing may be associated with transmission of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea in MSM, irrespective of whether sex also occurs.

Chlamydia trachomatis and the Risk of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Ectopic Pregnancy, and Female Infertility

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciz429, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz429
Published: 24 August 2019

Abstract

Background

We evaluated the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and infertility in women with a previous Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) diagnosis compared with women who tested negative for CT and CT untested women, considering both targeted and incidental (ie, prescribed for another indication) use of CT-effective antibiotics.

Methods

This was a retrospective study of women aged 12–25 years at start of follow-up within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink GOLD database linked to index of multiple deprivation quintiles, 2000–2013. CT test status and antibiotic use were determined in a time-dependent manner. Risk of PID, ectopic pregnancy, or female infertility were evaluated using of Cox proportional hazard models.

Results

We studied 857 324 women, contributing 6 457 060 person-years. Compared with women who tested CT-negative, women who tested CT-positive had an increased risk of PID (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–2.79), ectopic pregnancy (aHR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.38–2.54), and infertility (aHR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.27–2.68). The PID risk was higher for women with 2 or more positive CT tests than those with 1 positive test. PID risk increased with the number of previous antibiotic prescriptions, regardless of CT test status.

Conclusions

We showed an association between CT-positive tests and 3 adverse reproductive health outcomes. Moreover, this risk increased with repeat CT infections. CT-effective antibiotic use showed no decreased risks of subsequent PID regardless of CT history. Our results confirm the reproductive health burden of CT, which requires adequate public health interventions.