Alcohol and other drug treatment services – Key findings in 2014–15

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016

Key findings in 2014–15:

Agencies

  • A total of 843 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided services to clients seeking treatment and support for alcohol and other drug problems, an increase of 27% over the 5-year period to 2014–15.

Clients

  • Around 115,000 clients received just over 170,000 treatment episodes from alcohol and other drug treatment agencies.
  • 2 in 3 clients were male (67%), just over half were aged 20–39 (54%), and 1 in 7 clients were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (15%).
  • The alcohol and other drug client group is an ageing cohort, with a median age of 33 years in 2014–15, up from 31 in 2005–06. Since 2005–06 there has been a decline in the proportion of 20–29 year olds being treated (from 33% to 27% of treatment episodes), while the proportion of those aged 40 and over rose from 26% to 32%.
  • The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines (20%) has continued to increase over the last 10 years, from 11% of treatment episodes in 2005–06, and 17% in 2013–14.

Treatment

  • There was an increase in the number of closed treatment episodes between 2005–06 and 2014–15, from 151,362 to 170,367—a 13% increase over the 10-year period.
  • In 2014–15, the top 4 principal drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (38% of treatment episodes), cannabis (24%), amphetamines (20%) and heroin (6%).
  • Treatment for the use of amphetamines increased over the 5 years to 2014–15 (from 9% of closed treatment episodes to 20%).
  • Over the 10 years since 2005–06, treatment types received by clients have not changed substantially, with counselling, assessment only and withdrawal management being the most common types of treatment—this was the same for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous clients.

AOD 2014-2015

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Over one-third of homelessness clients seek domestic & family violence support

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 3 February 2016

The report, Domestic and family violence and homelessness 2011-12 to 2013–14, is the first of its kind to examine multiple years of homelessness data.

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Domestic and family violence and homelessness in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), December 2015

Key findings

  • 187,000 (or one-third) of the 520,000 Australians who accessed specialist homelessness services (SHS) between 2011–12 and 2013–14 were adults and children seeking assistance for reasons of domestic and family violence.
  • The complexity of domestic and family violence situations requires continued support over long time periods. Domestic and family violence clients received, on average, more days of support than other SHS clients (136 days compared with 92 days of support, respectively).
  • Almost 1 in 4 domestic and family violence clients recorded more than 300 days of support between their first and last support periods. By comparison, this level of support was provided to less than 1 in 5 other SHS clients.
  • Family and domestic violence clients were more likely than other SHS clients to request accommodation services. Where short term accommodation was requested, family and domestic violence clients were more likely to have that request met than other clients (82% compared with 61%, respectively).
  • Between 2011–12 and 2013–14 the proportion of domestic and family violence clients moving into public and community housing increased from 14% to 22%.
  • However, 20% of domestic and family violence clients ended their support with no shelter, couch surfing or no tenure and a further 20% were in short term accommodation.

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One in five women giving birth in Australia are 35 or over, data shows

Guardian Australia, Monday 14 December 2015

More than one in five women giving birth in Australia are now aged 35 or over, the latest official figures show.

The latest birth data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows the proportion of mothers aged 35 and older who gave birth increased by four percentage points to 22% in the decade to 2013.

Women who gave birth aged under 24 decreased from 19% to 17%; 30.1 years was the average age in 2013, up from 29.5 years a decade earlier. First-time mothers had an average age of 28.6 years.

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