Analysis of cervical cancer and abnormality outcomes in an era of cervical screening and HPV vaccination in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Release Date: 

This is the third report from an Australian-first project, combining screening, cancer, death, and HPV vaccination data to demonstrate the effects of screening and HPV vaccination on cervical cancer, precancerous abnormalities and cervical screening behaviour.

Screen-detected cervical cancers were less likely to cause death than those diagnosed in never-screened women, and HPV-vaccinated women were more likely to participate in cervical screening, and less likely to have a high-grade abnormality.

 

One in six Australian women experience abuse before they are 15, data shows

Damning new data about Australia’s rates of domestic and sexual violence reveal that one in six women experience abuse before they are 15 and one woman is killed by her partner every nine days.

Based on national population surveys and set against a backdrop of declines in overall violence, rates of partner violence and sexual violence have remained relatively stable since 2005, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows.

Drug and alcohol report uncovers burden in regional Australia

ABC Central West, 15/03/2019

A report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has revealed alarming statistics about drug and alcohol use in regional Australia, and the difficulties faced by those seeking treatment.

The report found a 41 per cent increase in drug-induced deaths in regional and remote areas in the decade to 2017, compared to a 16 per cent spike in major cities.

Researchers said this could be attributed to opioid overdoses.

The report found there was a higher rate of people seeking drug and alcohol treatment in regional and remote communities in 2016–17, but they were likely to travel one hour or more to receive treatment.

It also said people in country areas were more likely to smoke, drink heavily, use drugs, and avoid exercise.

Australia’s health 2018 (Report)

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,  Release Date: 

 

Australia’s Health 2018 is the AIHW’s 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots.

The report also summarises the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

Australia’s health 2018: in brief is a companion report to Australia’s health 2018.

Table of contents:

Whole report:

PDF Report (17.3Mb)

Australia’s health 2018 in brief:

Companion ‘in brief’ booklet presents highlights in a compact easy-to-use format.

 

Healthy Communities: HPV immunisation rates in 2014–15

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2017

Immunisation against the highly contagious human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent cervical and other cancers, and other HPV-related diseases. The National HPV Vaccination Program has been immunising adolescent girls since 2007 and was extended to boys in 2013.

This third Healthy Communities report on HPV immunisation shows the percentage of girls aged 15 across 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas who were fully immunised against HPV in 2014–15. For the first time, the percentage of boys fully immunised are also shown by PHN area.

The report finds that in 2014–15:

  • Nationally, nearly 79% of girls aged 15 were fully immunised against HPV, an increase from 74% in 2013–14 and 72% in 2012–13
  • There remains relatively large variation in HPV immunisation rates for girls across PHN areas, ranging from 86% of girls fully immunised in Murrumbidgee (NSW) to 67% in Tasmania
  • Nationally, 67% of boys aged 15 were fully immunised against HPV and across PHN areas percentages ranged from 78% in Gippsland (Vic) to 57% in the Northern Territory.

Download Healthy Communities: HPV immunisation rates in 2014–15 (PDF, 3.5 MB)

Domestic violence leading cause of hospitalised assault among girls and women in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), 19 April 2017

Nearly 6,500 women and girls were hospitalised due to assault in Australia in 2013–14, with the violence usually perpetrated by a partner or spouse, according to new analysis from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The data, available as part of a new series of fact sheets on selected injuries, shows that over half of hospitalised assaults against women and girls were perpetrated by spouses or domestic partners (59% of cases where the perpetrator was specified), with injuries to the head most common (61%).

Parents and other family members accounted for nearly half of the remaining cases where the type of perpetrator was specified.