Report: 6th National Survey of Australian Secondary Students and Sexual Health

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS), 2019

The Secondary Students and Adolescent Sexual Health survey is a national study exploring the sexual health and well-being of Australian adolescents. The anonymous survey asks questions about knowledge, behaviour and educational experiences related to sexual health and well-being.

The Commonwealth Department of Health funded study has been conducted approximately every 5 years since 1992. This is the 6th time the survey has been conducted in Australia. Results play a vital role in safeguarding the nation’s health by informing the national strategies to prevent HIV, sexually transmissible infections and blood-borne viruses as well as providing valuable information to improve service provision and education across multiple sectors.

Largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of young LGBTIQ people

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, 2019

This is Me is the largest national study exploring the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people in Australia. Conducted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, this short (8-10 minute) survey asks young people a range of questions about health and wellbeing as well as who young people go to for help and support if they need it.

This is Me is the fourth study of its kind. ARCSHS has previously conducted versions of this study in 1998, 2004 and 2010, as well as a study specifically about the health and wellbeing of transgender and gender diverse young people in 2014. These studies documented high levels of harm, and examined the impact that such stigma and discrimination had on the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ+ young people, as well as seeking to better understand who LGBTIQ+ young people turned to when in need.

The data collected from This is Me will provide important insight into the present-day lives and experiences of LGBTIQ young people. The responses young people give will help us to understand what can support LGBTIQ young people to thrive.

Evidence from the study will enable organisations, services and government to make informed decisions about how to best support the health and wellbeing of LGBTIQ young people. Findings from the study will inform the development of LGBTIQ-inclusive mainstream, and LGBTIQ-specific, youth policies, programs and services.

 

  • Please do not promote the survey via Twitter – this platform is deliberately not part of the promotion strategy.

 

  • You can let young people know the supports available to them if filling out the survey triggers any strong feelings and they want to chat about it. If you offer counselling or support, let them know. Remind young people of support options such as Qlife, headspace or Reachout. Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 or atkidshelpline.com.au or Lifeline on 13 11 14 or at lifeline.org.au 24 hours/day 7 days per week.

 

  • Read the FAQ here FAQs

 

 

HIV Futures 9: deadline extended, last chance to participate, closes 28th May

The Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, May 2019

HIV Futures is a survey about health, treatments, work, finances, sex and relationships of people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV Futures is run by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and
Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, who are still seeking participants for HIV Futures 9.

If you are aged over 18 years and living with HIV, please fill in the online survey, it takes about 25 minutes.

HIV Futures is the largest and most influential Australian study of people living with HIV. It has been running for 21 years, and directly informs quality of life indicators in the National HIV strategy and is used for HIV community service planning and advocacy.

Hepatitis C – Peer insights on barriers and motivators to Direct-Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatment uptake

ARCSHS, 2018

The knowledge and experience of people who inject drugs (PWID) within peer programs is a vital asset to strategies for the scale-up of DAA treatment among PWID (Brown and Reeders, 2016). This study is focused on translating these “real time” peer insights into resources that support policy and programs to tailor to the needs of communities of people who inject.

This tailoring is critical to achieving the goal of eliminating hepatitis C. This broadsheet is the first of a series that will be produced over the duration of the project. This series will present current peer insights from the peer workers and other members of the people who inject community on the access to and uptake of the new hepatitis C treatment.

This broadsheet provides background to the study and presents an overview of the attitudes, beliefs and experiences of PWID related to the access and scale-up of direct acting antiviral treatment among this community.

A research project by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society in collaboration with peer-based organisations – Peer Based Harm Reduction WA, NSW Users and AIDS Association and Harm Reduction Victoria.

HIV and hepatitis pre and post test discussion in Victoria: consultation report

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Nov 2017

In February 2017, the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University initiated a consultation which aimed to describe best practice in HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C pre and post test discussion in the Victorian context.

Building on existing evidence, and guided by the National Testing Policies, the purpose of this consultation was to better understand the components of a quality testing encounter in the era of elimination, with particular emphasis on the non-medical needs of people around the time of testing and diagnosis.

The focus of this consultation was to identify best practice in pre and post test discussion for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. A range of health and community providers and researchers discussed the fundamentals of best practice at length, and provided a great many insights into the components of quality testing services.
Importantly, most participants acknowledged that while best practice is a valuable notion, it is not attainable in all health care settings. Best practice, therefore, needs to be flexible enough to be able to fit into any setting where HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C testing may occur.

 

HIV Futures 8: Women Living with HIV in Australia

Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, 2017

In 2015, there were just under 3,000 women living with (diagnosed) HIV in Australia, representing around 10% of the overall number of Australians currently living with HIV. The experience of living with HIV can be very different for women than it is for men. 

HIV Futures 8 is a survey about the health and wellbeing of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in AustraliaThe study is designed to inform the Australian National HIV Strategy and guide community and clinical service provision for PLHIV. Findings from HIV Futures 8 are presented as a series of short reports.

The 74 women who completed the survey were aged between 19 and 80 years, with a median of 49 years. HIV Futures 8 is a broad survey covering issues such as financial security, housing status, antiretroviral treatment use, general health issues, stigma and discrimination, clinical and support service use, aging, drug and alcohol use, sexual health, relationships, and social connectedness.

  • Download report (PDF)  here