Poorer outcomes for babies born to teen mums – often linked to low socioeconomic status

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare,  02 May 2018

Babies of teenage mothers often experience poorer health outcomes than babies born to women just a few years older, according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare’s (AIHW) first report on this subject.

The report, Teenage mothers in Australia 2015, shows that about 8,200 teenage mothers gave birth to 8,300 babies (3% of all babies) in 2015, down from 11,800 teenage mothers giving birth a decade earlier. Almost three-quarters of teenage mothers were aged 18 or 19.

One in 4 (24%) of all teenage mothers were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. Indigenous teenage mothers had higher levels of antenatal risk factors and poorer baby outcomes than non-Indigenous teenage mothers in terms of pre-term birth
and low birthweight.

 

Clinical Practice Guidelines: Pregnancy Care (2018 Edition)

Australian Government Department of Health, February 2018

Modules 1 and 2 of the Antenatal Care Guidelines have now been combined and updated to form a single set of consolidated guidelines that were renamed Pregnancy Care Guidelines and publicly released in February 2018. 

The Pregnancy Care Guidelines are designed to support Australian maternity services to provide high-quality, evidence-based antenatal care to healthy pregnant women. They are intended for all health professionals who contribute to antenatal care including midwives, obstetricians, general practitioners, practice nurses, maternal and child health nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and allied health professionals. They are implemented at national, state, territory and local levels to provide consistency of antenatal care in Australia and ensure maternity services provide high-quality, evidence-based maternity care. The Pregnancy Care Guidelines cover a wide range of topics including routine physical examinations, screening tests and social and lifestyle advice for women with an uncomplicated pregnancy.

Guidelines:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (PDF 5747 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care (Word 3615 KB)

Accompanying documents:

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (PDF 1979 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Short-form guidelines (Word 1330 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (PDF 1758 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Administrative Report (Word 1150 KB)

Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (PDF 2183 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Linking evidence to recommendations (Word 1259 KB)
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Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (PDF 1804 KB)
Clinical Practice Guidelines – Pregnancy Care – Economic analyses (Word 1298 KB)

Working with a transgender man who is pregnant

The Nurse Path blog, February 10., 2017

Some men have vaginas. 

It probably wouldn’t happen very often but if you are a health professional who cares for people during pregnancy and birth (ie a Midwife or Doctor), you may come across a transgender man who is pregnant.

This can be really challenging for people who may not have come across transgender people or issues. This is a guide to maybe help you in that situation. You’re welcome.

Read more here 

 

Responding to Female Genital Mutilation as a women’s health issue (forum)

SHine SA, January 2017

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons (WHO). It is also sometimes referred to as female genital cutting or female circumcision. There are 83,000 women and girls who have been affected by FGM in Australia. FGM has no health benefits but causes lifelong health consequences for women and girls.

Our ReFRESH forum will consist of a presentation on the topic and a personal experience of FGM. The aim is to provide participants with a better understanding of FGM. We will explore where, when, how and why FGM is practised, and how to care for survivors.

When: 9 February 2017

Where: SHine SA, 64c Woodville Road, Woodville

Time: 1.30 – 4.30 pm

Cost: $50 (Student Concession $45)

Light refreshments provided

FURTHER INFORMATION & ONLINE ENROLMENT here

Enquiries: Phone 8300 5320 / Email shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Download flyer here: FGM Forum

Greater support needed for pregnant transgender men

Medical News Today, 29 October 2015

Many transgender men who have the capacity to bear children are faced with barriers in the healthcare system as a result of a lack of training, argue Juno Obedin-Maliver and Harvey Makadon in a commentary published in SAGE journal Obstetric Medicine.

  • Read more here
  • Access original paper in Obstetric Medicine (free full text, PDF optional) here

Pregnancy Choices Training at SHine SA

SHine SA, 14 July, 2015

This two-day course, developed for professionals, defines and explains all the options available to women experiencing an unplanned pregnancy.

It is open to nurses, doctors, counsellors, community health workers, school counsellors, youth workers, indigenous health workers, and any professional who encounters clients with unplanned pregnancy.

This course includes:
• Global, national and local overview
• Exploration of pregnancy options
• Genetic issues in pregnancy
• Counselling responses to unplanned pregnancy
• Application to practice

When 27–28 July, 2015

Where SHine SA, GP PLus Health Care Centre,
64c Woodville Road, Woodville

(Parking off Bower Street)

Cost $300 (10% off if registered 2 months ahead)

Enquiries Tel: 8300 5317 E mail: shinesacourses@shinesa.org.au

Further Information and registration here

Flyer (PDF) here:  PCT flyer 2015